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Education - James Callcut, Lighting Controls Product Manager at RIDI


The awareness of lighting levels and in-class scene setting on the part of educators and installers is increasing significantly. Coupled with the impact of the economic downturn and the need to look at whole-life energy savings, this has led to a marked rise in the adoption of intelligent, energy saving lighting control in the education sector. With the use of absence detection, daylight linking and


maintenance-factor compensation, schools are all interested in making any extra energy savings they can, even if it means a higher up front investment. The ubiquity of electronic displays in the modern day classroom has resulted in a greater awareness of the importance of correct lighting levels. The lighting levels required for a traditional lesson are massively different to those required for a projector demonstration, or work with computers, for example. The advantage of a 'clever' control system is that it can provide a simple user interface with all of the 'cleverness' hidden, allowing staff to switch seamlessly between pre-set lighting levels.


Entertainment - Mark White, Manager for the UK and Ireland at ETC


For a venue’s house lighting to be used effectively, it must be easy to control by a wide range of different people, from highly trained lighting technicians, to front of house staff and cleaners. Each will require access to a range of different lighting states. By offering simple push button panels or an LCD screen, each type of user can be offered the lighting they need without requiring a stage lighting board operator, and without upsetting any other user by turning the house lights on during a performance, for example. Building control systems should be scalable, from small theatres to large buildings, including office blocks, shopping centres and schools but also larger theatres. Once configured, any member of staff should be able to easily operate the system – or the LCD touch screens can be locked with a pass code, to prevent unauthorised access. You might also want to run automatic events: wanting the lighting to dim after closing time, for example, or want it to come on when the venue opens or say one hour before sunset every day. Either of those is simple to apply with a system such as ETC Unison Paradigm.


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