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BARBICAN LIFE


the opera will continue on to a major international tour. From 29 May the legendary Ninagawa Company will once again be brought from Japan to London by producer Thelma Holt in a production of “Cymbeline” as part of the Royal; Shakespeare Theatre’s 2012 Festival. Having previously directed “Hamlet” and a kabuki “Twelfth Night”, Ninagawa is internationally renowned for his visually powerful stagings of Shakespeare’s romances and tragedies which are intricately detailed and totally absorbing in Japanese. Following this there will be an unprecedented season of ten works by Pina Bausch in both the Barbican and Sadlers Wells theatres until 9 July. This landmark


The Barbican Centre is always full of exciting events and the Barbican Weekender returns in March to give families, free of charge, a chance to participate in many fascinating events. Teenagers can design their own trainers and even 2 to 5 year-olds can look at the wonders of gravity by a German children’s company in the Pit. Adults can enjoy the wonders of what goes on behind the scenes in the Theatre, tread the boards and climb the flytower.


Pina Bausch Company’s Bamboo Blues Photo by


Angelos Giatopoulos


season will feature international co-productions exploring locations in India, Brazil, Palermo, Hong Kong, Los Angeles, Budapest, Istanbul, Santiago de Chile, Rome and Japan.


It should interest theatregoers to be reminded of some regular productions by the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and they will be presenting the David Edgar adaptation of “Nicholas Nickelby Part One” from 26-29 March at the Silk Street Theatre. This landmark adaptation became an instant classic when premiered by the RSC in 1980 and now celebrates the bicentenary of Charles Dickens’ birth.


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Einstein on the Beach – Photo by T. Charles Erickson


The visually spectacular


Ninagawa Company performing at The Barbican in 2007 Photo Hirotaku


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