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GROOVED PINS


Grooved pins are solid pins with three swaged grooves at 120° pitch along all or part of their length. When the pin is driven into a drilled hole of suitable diameter, the material displaced by the grooving process is forced back, to partially close up the grooves and lock the pin into place.


Advantages of grooved pins: < They do not need a precision reamed hole.


< They can have parallel grooves or tapered grooves. Parallel grooves give the pin high resistance to vibration, but need more force to insert.


< They can be grooved on only part of the length, so that where the pin has to be firmly fixed in one part of an assembly, but be a clearance fit on the other, both parts can be drilled to the same diameter.


MATERIALS MILD STEEL


STAINLESS A2 (WS 1.4305) STANDARDS


ISO standards were introduced in 1992 but in practise have not yet replaced the DIN standards. Technifast stocks DIN standards but ISO can be supplied to special order. Grooved pins are also referred to by GP numbers (see below).


DIN 1471 (GP1) SIMILAR TO ISO 8744 DIN 1472 (GP2) SIMILAR TO ISO 8745


Full length taper grooves used to fix two or more components together, but with less insertion force than DIN 1473


DIN 1473 (GP3) SIMILAR TO ISO 8740


Half length taper grooves used where part of the assembly must be a free fit


DIN 1474 (GP4) SIMILAR TO ISO 8741


Full length parallel grooves used to fix two or more components together with maximum rigidity


Half length reverse taper grooves used where the ungrooved portion acts as a stop or handle


DIN 1475 (GP8) SIMILAR TO ISO 8742


Third length centre grooves used on hinges or clevises where the two ends must act as pivots


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