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Issue 20, Feb/March


FOCUS EBAY TOUR


External view of eBay’s Project Mercury data center in Scottsdale, Arizona. (Notice the containers)


Cool, whatever the weather


One of two HP containers


Another measurement of the module’s partial PUE was taken in a “worst case scenario” at the end of August 2011, when outside air temperature was reaching 119F. The module was exposed to the sun, running loads ranging from idle to a maximum of 520kW. Measured over two hours, its partial PUE was 1.040 when it was idling and 1.044 at full load. The average PUE was 1.043.


As the facility is in one of the hottest locations


in the US, TGG called achievement “significant”. the


CUTTING-EDGE SAVINGS


Mercury is part of a consolidation project that eBay expects will generate savings to fund future data center portfolio investment. But savings don’t just come from having to operate a smaller number of data centers.


A common assumption is that such cutting- edge energy saving technology comes at a price premium, which infrastructure people have to sell to the Chief Financial Officer. Nelson says this assumption is wrong in Project Mercury’s case.


Just abandoning its old all-Tier IV infrastructure approach created huge savings. Project Mercury cost half as much as the maximum-reliability sites. “It’s half the cost or less for us to build out a facility that’s four- times the density,” he says.


Because of its efficiency, the operating cost is slashed in half as well, Nelson says. “I’m actually getting a huge cost benefit of being able to right-size my applications and build out a facility that’s extremely flexible for whatever technology’s coming in.” n


www.datacenterdynamics.com 13


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