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FENSTERBAUPREVIEW


BOWATER ARCHITECTURAL DEMONSTRATES EXPERTISE AT FENSTERBAU 2012


Bowater Architectural will be showcasing its impressive and unique System10 Aluminium window systems, at this year’s Fensterbau exhibition alongside the VEKA Group. The system offers specifiers and contractors alike outstanding thermal performance and stylish, sleek aesthetics at a keen entry level price – and can achieve the lowest U-value in the market, of just 0.7W/m2K.


System10 Aluminium will provide a U-value


of 1.4W/m2K when fitted with standard double glazed units and can actually achieve a U-value as low as 0.7W/m2K if required, all thanks to a unique multi – chamber thermal break. The durability and high-strength of the system means the product can be used for bespoke applications, as well as being used to create sizeable glazed areas and large opening sashes.


Visitors to the VEKA UK stand 6-343 will


have the chance to learn about the whole range, and see two configurations of the System10 Aluminium range: the Tilt and Turn and the Parallel window.


The System10 Aluminium Tilt and


Turn window is a high performance aluminium window, which because of its ingenious design, offers unbeatable thermal performance at a very competitive cost. The hinge and locking system allows the window to be used as a side hung open in sash, or as a tilt in sash hinged at the bottom. It features bevelled or square edge sightlines and a 70mm front to back dimension.


The Tilt and Turn window on show


achieves a U-value of 1.4W/m2K, 30dB Sound Reduction, and a WER rating of A+10. However, by incorporating standard triple glazing, the system can achieve a U-value 1.0W/m2K, 32dB sound reduction, as well as A+24 WER rating.


The System10 Aluminium Parallel Window has been designed as a safety device for use in a wide variety of applications as the entire window face opens out by up to 250mm gap all the way round – preventing anyone being able to exit via the window. This design provides excellent ventilation into the building, whilst eliminating the potential


76 « Clearview NMS « March 2012 « www.clearview-uk.com


risks associated with conventional opening windows and as such, is ideal for educational and healthcare sectors. Large opening sash sizes are possible with this system, opening up a wide range of design opportunities.


The complete System10 Aluminium range is the ultimate in customisable design. Depending upon the look and style of the building, the system can be powder coated, both internally and externally in any RAL colour, to complement its surroundings.


Richard Garland, Sales Director at Bowater


Architectural comments: “System10 Aluminium can be specified where ordinary aluminium windows cannot, including buildings that are required to meet the most stringent thermal and ecological standards.


“System10 Aluminium provides cost effective, energy efficient fenestration solutions for clients, specifiers, and contractors requiring windows, doors, and curtain walling systems for social housing, health and educational buildings and other commercial applications.”


Quality and long-term performance are


key considerations for Bowater Architectural and are the main reasons why the company’s products are so rigorously tested far beyond international criteria.


Bowater Architectural is a brand of the VEKA Group, the UK's leading provider of cost effective, energy efficient fenestration systems.


For more information on System10 Aluminium from Bowater Architectural please visit www.system10aluminium.co.uk.


To read more news, log onto www.clearview-uk.com and join in our Forum discussions.


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