This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ALUMINIUM


AREYOUR PROJECTS MEETING THE SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGE?


Richard Besant is the Sales Director for Powdertech, the Northants-based specialist metal finishing company. He is a member of the drafting committee for EN 13438 - the European standard for powder coating onto galvanized steel. Powdertech was established in 1988 and is a leading industry supplier and a fount of technical knowledge.


During 2011, Richard shared


his wealth of knowledge and experience with Clearview’s readers with advice focusing on four key areas:


• Choosing the right metal finishing process and supplier.


• Selecting the most suitable powder coating finish for fabrication contracts.


• The bottom-line value of developing close and honest working relationships within a supply chain partnership.


• The importance of international standards and how to influence their formulation.


In his 2012 columns, Richard


is turning his attention to key issues that impinge upon the metal finishing industry including sustainability in building, the environmental impact of powder coatings, design for galvanised steel and new technologies.


“Recently I was surprised to read in an article by the Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA,) that over 1 million tonnes of wood waste is sent to landfill each year. Although biodegradable, this is an enormous amount of waste product.”


Wood is typically regarded as an environmentally sound building material but even if it is from managed forests it is not a wholly recyclable material. Compare this to the astonishing recycling properties of aluminium.


• Of the aluminium produced since commercial discovery in 1880, 75 percent is still in use today.


• With no loss of strength or integrity, just over 97 percent of aluminium from a building is recyclable.


• Aluminium uses only 5 percent of its original production energy in order to be recycled.


Source: Council for Aluminium in Building (CAB)


Sustainable development is a


much quoted phrase and one that has been criticised both for being vague and for being an oxymoron. Nevertheless, its values cannot be disputed – in essence it means ‘development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’ and that is an outcome that we all support. The facts listed above show just how credible aluminium is as a sustainable material.


Taking every possible measure


to avoid unnecessary waste is a key issue in 2012 and one that is fundamental to the London 2012 Olympic Planning Committee.


The bid for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games committed to zero- waste and forms part of the London 2012 Sustainability Plan which includes the challenging


targets of zero waste from the Games going directly to landfill, and at least 70 percent of the waste being reused, recycled or composted.


Using aluminium in your construction projects is one of the most responsible and cost effective decisions you could make in 2012. It is the most abundant metal in the Earth’s crust and can be endlessly recycled, so much so that a ‘bank’ of aluminium is being built up for use in current and future buildings. Typically a new building will use around 45 percent recycled aluminium.


The atomic structure of aluminium is unaltered during the refining process and this is why it can be recycled with no loss of its intrinsic physical properties or value . When the old Wembley stadium was dismantled 96 percent of the aluminium was recovered for re-use.


Richard Besant Clearview NMS « March 2012 « www.clearview-uk.com » 71


Aluminium has to be the material of choice for sustainable development. To discuss the benefits of different metal finishes for aluminium products please call me on 01536 400890 or email Richard Besant.”


For more information download Powdertech’s Technical Data Brochure. Visit www.powdertech.co.uk.


To read more news, log onto www.clearview-uk.com and join in our Forum discussions.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100