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INDUSTRYNEWS


A SMOOTH OPERATION


As any manufacturer will know the machines you rely on, on a day to day basis need to be maintained to ensure they last for as long as possible and perform as they should with no surprise break downs.


Tradelink has invested time and money in bringing the routine maintenance of one of its machines in-house to minimise disruption and make it a much smoother operation. Jim Moody, Managing Director of Tradelink says: “As a World Class Manufacturer we are always looking for ways to make our operations more efficient. The team working with a particular machine on the factory floor identified that doing the routine maintenance on it in a slightly different way, would save us two weeks of downtime each year and cut costs of the maintenance by half.”


“We have always planned well in advance of this downtime so customers aren’t affected, but by bringing the maintenance in-house we were able to identify that the steps that needed to be performed could be broken down into separate sections that could be tackled over six weekends.”


“The result of this change is no downtime in our working week, which makes for an even more efficient operation.”


“The team at Tradelink is dedicated to World Class Manufacturing principles which means the people close to the day to day operations


Tradelink runs a smooth operation.


get to decide how they are best run for the benefit of the company and more importantly for the benefit of our customers.”


For more information call Tradelink now on 01354 657650 or visit www.tradelinkdirect.co.uk.


To read more news, log onto www.clearview-uk.com and join in our Forum discussions.


“SYMPATHETIC AND STRIKING” PROJECT FROM VULCAN


A Sea Cadets' building in Hull got a new lease of life recently, thanks in part to the sympathetic window replacement carried out by Hull-based Synseal fabricator and installer, Vulcan Windows.


The period property presented a number


of challenges to the company, not least the building's general state of disrepair. “The Sea Cadets project was quite a challenge because the building was dilapidated and in poor condition,” Peter O’Brien, Vulcan’s Commercial Manager, said. “Most of the fenestrations were boarded up and there was evidence of subsidence.”


The company replaced the boxed sash timber casements with PVCu windows made from Synseal's Shield profile. Extra care was taken to incorporate the very ornate internal decorative reveals.


“We replaced the frames while being sympathetic to retaining the internal finishes,” Peter explained. “The Chairman of


56 « Clearview NMS « March 2012 « www.clearview-uk.com


the board of governors, Mr Captain Pearson, commissioned the works, and he and the rest of the board were delighted with the finished work.”


The improvements to the Sea Cadets building will be featured in the local press to celebrate the new life and interest in the building which has been stimulated by the refurbishment.


The difference that building renovation can


make, including new windows, hit a chord with those working on this project. “I got a lot of satisfaction from being involved in


this project,” Peter said. “I've been in the business for 20 years, and driving past the Sea Cadets building each day makes me very proud to have been associated with it. I'm sure the students who use this building will benefit from the investment in their environment.”


Brian Walker, Synseal’s Fabricator


Development Manager, said the project was a fine example of how PVCu windows are being more widely accepted on sensitive period properties. “There's no doubt that in some cases PVCu windows can be inelegantly designed and improperly fitted, as can timber and aluminium.” he said. “However, on the Sea Cadets building, Vulcan Windows have proved that PVCu replacement window solutions can be sympathetic and striking, and that the companies who make and install them take absolute pride in their work.”


To read more news, log onto www.clearview-uk.com and join in our Forum discussions.


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