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will last that long! NB: Store your left over fruit in a container in the fridge and use for cakes, mince pies and a very alcoholic topping for ice cream.


Christmas Cocktail This is a wonderful alcohol-free recipe. The selection of fruit gives the end result an incredibly festive colour! You will require a liquidiser or smoothie maker.


Preparation: 10 minutes Serves: Six


be honey coloured and have a syrupy consistency like a liqueur.


4. You must sterilise your bottle or jars before decanting the vodka. Preheat your oven to a low setting (110c/225f/Gas ¼) and wash your bottles or jars thoroughly in hot, soapy water. Rinse well and place upright (with the metal lids of the jars if you are using them) on a baking sheet. Place in the oven and leave for 30 minutes.


86 | ukhandmade | Winter 2011 5. Strain the vodka mixture into a


large bowl. I use a colander lined with a jelly bag or muslin but you could also use a fine sieve. Don’t throw away the discarded fruit because this can be used later. Using a funnel, pour your vodka into the sterilised bottles or jars, making sure to leave a gap of 1cm at the top.


6. Seal. This flavoured vodka will keep in your fridge or freezer for up to 6 months but I very much doubt it


You will need: • 1 pomegranate (or a pack of pomegranate seeds)


• 100g frozen raspberries • 2 seedless Clementine’s • 150ml cranberry juice • Lemonade or ginger ale • A fine sieve or muslin


How to: 1. Open your packet of pomegranate seeds or quarter the pomegranate and extract the seeds, carefully


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