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LIFESTYLE: Winter Warmer by Bebe Bradley of Meninafeliz


Our household doesn’t Christmas


‘do’ pudding. We do,


however, appreciate a rather large slice of Panettone, the deliciously fragrant and sweet Italian festive bread filled with candied fruit and raisins.


As Christmas is traditionally a time for over-indulging in food and drink, what better way to celebrate the best of both worlds than with some homemade Panettone Vodka?


For those who don’t want to


over-egg their Christmas custard - and for those who inevitably will - there’s also a non-alcoholic cocktail included.


Panettone Vodka Preparation: 15 minutes plus 3-4 weeks maceration. Makes: Approximately 1 litre.


You will need: • 200g luxury dried mixed fruit • 100g luxury mixed peel • 100g of good quality glace cherries • 500g light brown soft sugar, plus an extra 100g to taste


• 100g bag toasted flaked almonds • 50 ml good quality vanilla extract • 70cl bottle of vodka • A large plastic container with a lid, at least 2 litre capacity


• Empty glass bottle or jars


How to: 1. Take the plastic container and add to it, your fruit, flaked almonds and sugar. Pour over the vanilla extract and vodka. Mix well.


85 | ukhandmade | Winter 2011


2. Seal the lid of your container tightly (to prevent the alcohol evaporating) and store at room temperature in a cool, dark place. Leave to soak for 3 weeks, stirring or agitating the container every other day, to help the sugar dissolve.


3. After 3 weeks, taste your vodka for sweetness, adding extra sugar if necessary and leave for another week to dissolve. The vodka should


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