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FOCUS: Baby’s First Winter by Siobhian Carroll of www.siobhiancarroll.com


The last two winters have been harsher than many I can remember in London and, this year, with a new-born baby to keep cosy I'm very aware that I'm going to have to plan ahead when it comes to purchasing items to keep her warm when the nights start to draw in, but at night you have to be careful not to cover your little one in too much bedding.


Experts recommend that to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome you should put your baby on his/her back without any pillows or coverings at all and that the room should be warm but not overheated, so finding the right balance can seem a little daunting.


You can choose a warm fitted flannel sheet for your baby's cot, dress


80 | ukhandmade | Winter 2011


baby in a onesie with feet and, if possible, built in scratch mitts. For extra warmth add a vest underneath the onesie and invest in a couple of gro-bags/sleeping bags; these are fabulous. You zip baby into them keeping baby cosy all night and, unlike blankets, they can't be kicked off. However they are sleeveless so if you still want to pop a blanket onto baby, make sure it's a thin one, pull it up to just under babies arms, then tuck it in all around, under the mattress.


Something as simple as making sure your baby doesn’t sleep near a window or anywhere that is draughty can make a huge difference. You can also warm a cold bed with a hot water bottle but be sure to remove it before putting your baby to sleep.


In my quest to keep my little one cosy this winter I spoke to Mark and Paul, the guys behind The Little Green Sheep online shop which is the home of baby bedtimes, specialising in award-winning organic baby bedding, mattresses, cots, sleepwear and other brilliant cosy products.


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