This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Batteries: Collect these up in a bag or container and take them along to your local waste management or recycling centre where there should be special collection points or consider


using rechargeable batteries instead!


Plastic Bags: Most of the main supermarkets now offer plastic bag recycling. If possible use a canvas eco-shopping bag when you go to the supermarket which is far friendly to the environment and wildlife! Artisan specific recycling tips focus on re-using and up-cycling materials and components. Check out the bi- weekly Eco-tip for a plethora of ideas you might want to try out yourself


Ethics Some of my artisan and designer friends try to push this to the furthest corner of their minds during their creative process and don’t dig too deep when buying their materials or tools. Do you know where your materials come from? Beads, textiles, canvases, paints, clay, gemstones


54 | ukhandmade | Winter 2011


… do you know the origins of your base materials? Have you tried to find out? If not, now is the right time to ask that question and there is a lot of help out there to assist you in choosing more ethically produced materials. If you are in doubt, try to choose your materials from local sources where possible; here are some resources to help you evaluate where you can make changes:


• Ethical Fashion Resource • Cooperative Fair Trade Organisation • Karen Hill Tribes Foundation


Another way in which to steer your business in a more ethical direction is by supporting local charities and wildlife projects. I do this with most of my design ranges with a percentage of the profit going directly to them. By doing this, I raised over £160 just this summer for the Horse World Charity and over £1000 in art materials in 2007 for the Kailash Children Fund. I took those art materials to the Kailash Children myself via an expedition into the


Himalayas (of course you don’t need to go that far!). It was a trip that truly changed my life and approach to my creations and I now run a very ethical and green design business as a result. My hope is to inspire other artisans to take steps out of their comfort zone to dig deeper, to the roots of the materials that they use and find out about the people that produce them; it’s a journey worth taking!


If you found this article of interest you may also like to read:


• Green Guide for Artists • Non-Profit guide to going Green • Eco-chic, the fashion paradox • 1000 New Eco-designs and where to find them • Handbook for eco-paints and finishes


• Eco-Colour: Botanical Dyes for beautiful textiles


• The Eco-Living Handbook Images


courtesy of Brandstatter and Memake Iris von


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