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use of their facilities. They'll take care of glass, plastic, paper, cans and garden cuttings. This is a no-brainer!


Part and parcel: Buy products with less packaging - why spend money on something you throw away? For items you use regularly, buying in bulk reduces excess card and plastic.


Pass it on: Charity shops and www. freecycle.org are a great way to pass on unwanted items or try a car boot sale or eBay!


Toxic: Many cleaning products


contain harmful chemicals. Make sure you use the entire product so nothing remains in the container when you get rid of it or, even better, choose eco-friendly alternatives.


Electrical items: Some retailers are happy to take back old electrical items which can be used for parts. Your local council may also accept them at their waste-recycling centre.


Mobile phones: There are plenty of 53 | ukhandmade | Winter 2011


mobile phone recycling companies these days that advertise on the TV and elsewhere. If you have old mobile phones lying around consider sending them off for recycling and make some cash in return.


Furniture: Reclaimed, up-cycled and recycled furniture and accessories are all the rage at the moment. Designs which utilise recycled material such as glass, wood or plastic is becoming increasingly stylish and innovative. Often these recycled pieces of furniture tend to be more solid with


better craftsmanship than their disposable flat pack alternatives.


Paper: Avoid getting unwanted junk mail through the door by putting up a “no junk mail” sign. Re-use envelopes by sticking labels over the address or recycle them as paper. If you bank online or have online accounts for your utilities, why not opt into paperless banking and billing schemes so you don’t receive a ton of paper from your bank or utilities providers in the post.


Recycled Tweed Bag by Memake


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