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The Beekeeper's quilt is one of the most talked about patterns in knitting circles at the moment; why do you think it appeals to so many people? I am totally and utterly shocked and overwhelmed by the response. I had no idea anyone would even see the pattern let alone join in the fun! I was worried that the pictures wouldn’t show it well enough so I made a video blog. I was totally obsessed with hexipuffs while I was making the quilt; I made them incessantly. Now that I’ve finished my quilt, I really need to start making them again because I miss having that 20 min project on the go. I feel so happy that people are having such a blast with it.


UK Handmade believes that the act of "making" is very therapeutic; how do you feel about this? I definitely agree. Life is about creation, about birth and invention. It’s so natural to want to put things together with our hands. The sense of accomplishment that comes at


13 | ukhandmade | Winter 2011


the end of creation is what keeps me going. It is a bit of a drug really. It is also a hard philosophy to wrestle with in the craft of knitting. Lots of times we spend way more time on the “journey” of knitting than we do with the “end product.” It’s a life lesson to enjoy each stitch on the way to your sweater, because let’s face it, lots of those finished sweaters stay in the drawer (at least mine do). The process of creating finished knitting takes a long time. If knitters don’t break themselves free of the question, “When will I finish this?” we are going to be miserable knitters.


What do you love most about knitting and what do you find the most frustrating? It is incredibly rare for me to come up with an idea, get the needles and yarn and cast-on and go and it all turns out perfectly first try. Every time I begin a new idea, I knit some, or even half, or all of it and have to rip it all out and start over. Most of my patterns have been restarted at least ten times. This is the hardest


thing for me. It’s very difficult for me to cast-on knowing with absolute surety that it won’t be right, that I will undoubtedly have to rip it out and start again. It is part of the process though and if I don’t start it, I’ll never find out what I’m doing wrong. The part I love best is getting it right.


What is your favourite knitted item you have ever made; can we take a peek? I love the meow mitts. They aren’t hugely popular but they tick all of my boxes and still make my heart leap.


Can you tell us a bit about where you do your knitting, your “creative space” can we take a sneaky peek? I live in an attic right now. I come down for coffee and bike rides to the swing set. I can see only treetops and clouds from where I sit so it’s a very windy energy. I’m looking forward to coming back down to the ground again soon. Thinking about the element of air has taught me a


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