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Butcher Gary Harris - his father Ray has had a market stall for 49 years


These days, markets no longer just concentrate on ‘fruit and veg’ and Plymouth’s leading the way in terms not just of food produce, but the vast array of clothing, shoes, books, household items, rugs, curtains, beauty products, candles, sweets....to name but a few.


Recent additions to City Market have included a stall selling African food, illustrating the fact that the market contains a diverse range of products, many of which are literally not available anywhere else in the city.


With its continued success more and more people are putting the City Market on their shopping list. With an hour’s parking available behind the market for just £1, there is time to have a good look around and see what’s on offer.


When comparing the prices against the supermarkets and other outlets, shoppers soon experience the value for money that the market retailers offer – helping the household budget go that bit further.


Many shoppers now visit on a regular basis to pick up the products which they’ve found a whole lot cheaper at the market.


Shoppers who want to spend longer browsing


can park at Western Approach Car Park, which has now been upgraded to pay on exit and is just a covered walkway away from the market.


So next time try the Plymouth City Market and meet some of their enthusiastic retailers. They’re keen to welcome shoppers to the friendly atmosphere and also provide superb value for money.


The market is open from 8am to 5.30pm Mondays to Saturdays (4.30pm close on Wednesday).


the plymouth magazine 17


Lance Tapp (above) has had a deli stall in the market for 36 years while Carol Hannaford has run Carol’s Cosmetics for 10 years


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