This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
I


Crème de la crème


remember a time when skincare was easy, when my complexion was naturally fl awless and a daily dab of Nivea or a slick of Vaseline was all it took to ensure continued peachiness. My, how things have changed.


At a recent dressing table clearout I counted 42 creams in various stages of use. I have lotions and potions for every conceivable beauty fl aw and sign of ageing – from turkey neck to crows’ feet, from redness reducer to self-tanner, it’s all there. In short, if my skin has a problem, any problem, I have the perfect product to deal with it. For a quick fi x solution, I can slather on an Turnaround Instant Facial or Beauty Flash Balm. Midnight Secret or Advanced Night Repair formulations are among my hard-working, overnight weapons. And should I feel particularly past it, there’s nothing like a drop of Youth Activator to restore that dewy glow. I could go on – serums and concentrates, balms and soothers, regenerators and energisers, eye brighteners and skin perfectors… is this cosmetic science gone mad? Or marketing for the deluded?


Probably a bit of both. Because,


actually, there was nothing wrong with Nivea and Vaseline. In fact, both original products are still going strong in today’s sophisticated market, the packaging hardly changed from 30 years ago, except now channelling a cute retro vibe. And I still love to use them on a regular basis.


But then, this is our 21st century world that we live in. A world where you need a degree in Advanced


Mirror mirror on the wall… Nicole Tata takes


a critical look at fashion, beauty and style.


Italian to order something as simple as a coffee. Where expectations are such that we demand solutions to whatever the problem may be and an app for everything. On refl ection, perhaps we should be grateful for the scientifi c advances that allow us to address increasingly specifi c issues, in skincare as well as elsewhere? And if the science exists, wouldn’t we want the marketers to tell us about products that use the new formulations? I guess it depends on how cynical you want to be.


Leaving aside the much bigger societal debate of whether it’s OK (necessary? desirable?) to want to erase character lines from one’s face at all, and always assuming that products can really deliver what they promise, I think on balance it’s good to have choice. How much choice? Well, if you want the simple answer to life, the universe and everything, it’s 42. ■


SUSSEX LIVING 47March 2012


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100