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Distance: Stiles:


Map: Parking: 5 miles


Mostly access is via gates but you will encounter the odd stile.


Ordnance Survey Explorer Map No. 122


Ditchling Beacon car park (fee payable).


Public Transport: The start of the walk is currently served by Brighton & Hove Bus No.79 (hourly) from Brighton Station on Sundays and Public Holidays only.


At the far end, cross two stiles and enter Upper Lodge Wood, following the wide path to a metal barrier giving access onto a metalled lane in the vicinity of the Upper Lodges car park. Follow the metalled lane downhill until you reach the top end of Stanmer village. The conical shaped hill way in front you is Firle Beacon to the east of Lewes. If you want to visit the Tea Rooms or Stanmer House, turn right. Otherwise, to resume the walk, turn left to pass farm buildings and follow the track uphill. The row of trees in front of you is


curiously named ‘Granny’s Belt’! At a cross paths, maintain direction, descending through woodland on a slightly sunken path to a hunting gate. Go forward, first with woodland and then with a fence on your left, climbing fairly steeply uphill to another cross paths. At the cross paths, bear left downhill before commencing a steady climb uphill on open downland to join the South Downs Way at Home Brow. On reaching the South Downs Way, turn left for Ditchling Beacon and the start of the walk. ■


44


SUSSEX LIVING March 2012


www.sussexliving.com





© Ordnance Survey (www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk)


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