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ABLE – the 4 day exercise on Dartmoor (Assessed Basic Leadership Exercise)


Britannia Royal Naval College’s mission is to deliver courageous leaders ready to fight and win.


Sailors, Aviators and Royal Marine Commandos. The Royal Navy continues to police the use of the sea,


providing security in partnership with allies and retains the unique ability to influence events at sea, on land and in the air providing real flexibility of choice to both military and political leaders.


The Royal Navy provides humanitarian aid and relief from the sea without the need to draw on a country’s infrastructure or resources. Naval units and personnel are designated to be on hand to help the six UK dependent territories in the Caribbean during the hurricane season and in recent years the Royal Navy has provided assistance in other parts of the world such as Sri Lanka in the aftermath of the tsunami.


In 2007 the Royal Navy evacuated over 4,000 UK- entitled persons from the Lebanon in just 6 days and, last year were tasked to evacuate UK-entitled persons from Benghazi during the Libyan uprising, an operation during which HMS Liverpool became the first naval warship to be fired upon since the Falklands Conflict. Maritime security extends to the safety of all those at sea. The Royal Navy’s contribution to maritime rescue services, as well as their cutting-edge hydrographical services,


IFT Breathing apparatus drill


helps ensure the sea, both at home and abroad, can be navigated safely by everyone.


Our maritime forces have the ability to operate across the spectrum of conflict and deliver sustainable military force at a time and place of our choosing, providing political choice through credible capability. This ability makes the Royal Navy as good at preventing wars as it is at winning them. The Royal Navy is ready to fight and win in combat at sea, on land or in the air. In order to achieve and maintain this standing the training our officers and ratings receive must fully prepare them for this. As such Britannia Royal Naval College’s mission is to deliver courageous leaders ready to fight and win.


INITIAL NAVAL TRAINING The latest intake of cadets are the first to be trained under a new system which retains all that was good in the previous model but which sequences training better and adds a newer, harder edge. We live in an age shaped by globalisation and have ready access to information. Current trends suggest that terrorism, climate change, shifts in population, religious tensions and increased competition for natural resources all have the potential to lead to crisis, confrontation and conflict and this was affirmed by last year’s Strategic Defence and Security Review. As such the Armed Forces have to remain at the top of their game with the Royal Navy no exception. To ensure that the Service remains


Man Overboard Drills


MARL – Picket Boat and RIB 51


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