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HUSBAND AND WIFE TEAM STEPHEN AND JOANNA WANTED TO CHANGE THE ANGEL’S NAME TO REFLECT A SIMPLER STYLE OF MENU, THEY ALSO WANTED TO RETAIN ITS FÉTED IDENTITY.


TEPHEN Bulmer has an infectious love of cooking and can’t wait to share his passion with the public via his interactive kitchen at The Angel, Dartmouth, previously Restaurant Angelique. The former chef director of the


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Raymond Blanc Cookery School is the new man at the helm of Dartmouth’s most iconic restaurant on the South Embankment, which is part of the 10 in 8 Fine Dining Group. Stephen is joined at The Angel by his wife Joanna, who is head of marketing at the 10 in 8 group. They are an inspiring duo, full of enthusiasm in their desire to build on the restaurant’s reputation for fantastic food, which acts as a magnet to diners from far and wide. Stephen brings a wealth of experience to the town’s famous restaurant, having trained at the renowned Michelin starred Box Tree in Yorkshire and subsequently worked for Raymond Blanc at the Michelin starred Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons as chef de cuisine; at George Blanc in Burgundy; Mallory Court, Warwickshire; Zafferano, Knightsbridge and Bibendum, Fulham. Keen to broaden his knowledge further, Stephen also gained experience in Thai cuisine at Nahm, London; in Japanese cuisine at Nobu, London and at several restaurants


of note in France and the USA. He was also a national finalist


in Young Chef of the Year in 1992 and 1993, a semi-finalist at the Roux-brothers scholarship competition and has appeared on various TV programmes including Ready, Steady, Cook. The Angel has enjoyed a chequered and colourful past. It was opened in the 1970s by the legendary cook Joyce Molyneux and was more recently run by celebrity Michelin chef, John Burton Race, when it hit the


best in the country.’ Joanna said the restaurant’s ethos


The first day we came we were on the ferry and I asked someone if they could tell us where the Restaurant Angelique was and I was met with a blank face.


headlines after administration, closure and re-launches followed his stint on I’m A Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here. Stephen has the greatest respect for both chefs and aims to mix ingredients from both of their styles in his menu. He said: ‘My menu consists of a bit of old, a bit of new, in between John Burton Race and Joyce Molyneux. ‘I don’t need silly garnish, I like to let the ingredients speak for themselves and the produce here is some of the


is to offer ‘great food at affordable prices’ in a relaxed setting. She explained: ‘I’ve been looking at what would work well in the area and having done that our intention is to make the restaurant a little bit less formal and more relaxed. ‘We’re not chasing Michelin stars, we just want to provide great food at good value prices. ‘Stephen has meat, fish and vegetarian options on the menu, he wants to keep it a little bit more straightforward in keeping with the restaurant’s change of name. ‘He has a broad range of experience that he would


like to reflect in his menus. He makes home-made pasta and breads and believes in simple, delicious food that doesn’t need to be overdressed.’ ‘He’s having a great time


experiencing all the local produce and he’s very keen for anyone who does produce locally to bring their stuff in and show him.’ Very much a people-person, with a ready smile and a good sense of fun, Stephen is fervent about training up and coming chefs. He relishes the abundance of fresh, local produce on his doorstep including Brixham crab, locally caught fish, meat reared on nearby farms and native grown fruit and vegetables. ‘I love to teach and train cookery,’ he said.


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