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and friends. Swing & Gypsy Jazz will be represented by Te Electric Swing Circus at the Guildhall. Once again the Flavel will be playing host to several acts and workshops, including what promises to be a wonderful evening of jazz from Steve Waterman, one of the top trumpet players in the UK who will be playing with Simon Spillett, winner of the tenor saxophone category at the British Jazz Awards 2011. Tey will be accompanied by Craig Milverton and his quartet. Craig was voted Jazz Pianist of the Year at the British Jazz Awards 2010. Te Flavel will also play host to the Devon Youth Jazz Orchestra, so why not check out the up-and-coming local jazz talent? Te Spice Bazaar is a great venue


for music and this year is welcoming Martin Dale who will be playing some funky Swing Jazz and an eclectic mix of other styles ranging from ballads to be bop. Alternatively, get away from the hustle and bustle in the Grill Room at the Royal Castle where local talent Rifftide ( Antonia Suner and Jonathan Hughes-Jones) will be playing some laid back jazz.


Folk Always well represented at the DMF and in the middle of something of a popular resurgence in the UK thanks to the likes of Mumford & Sons - folk will certainly attract many fans to the festival. Sidmouth based Belshazzar’s Feast, comprising of Paul Sartin and Paul Hutchinson, both long standing members of the folk scene, promise to be fantastic musically and their intelligent banter between songs will delight and entertain almost as much. For a more off the wall version of folk why not go and have a look at Roots/Folk outfit Newrising at the Market Square. Tey have a really interesting line up of instruments, including a Peruvian Box Drum – well worth a visit just to find out what this fascinating sounding instrument actually is! Te Dartmouth Apprentice plays host


to the folk band Te Stringbeans – all classically trained musicians who prefer to use their talents in non classical set ups. While Tattie Jam will light up the Market Square and Guildhall with Scottish influenced Folk, performing everything from slow airs to reels and jigs. If you have ever fancied making your own didgeridoo and then playing it, just go along to Tattie Jam’s workshop at the Flavel. And for Bluegrass and Roots Folk fans there will be Medicine Creek at the Guildhall and the Windjammer. Ten it is back to the Flavel for Beth Porter & Te Availables who contrast cello, ukulele and recorder with a voice ‘as pure as springwater’. Te lovely sounds of Moor Reason will grace Bayards Cove with their melodic and lyrical songs and Rebecca Mayes will enchant you with her Nu Folk sound and magical, fairytale songs.


Choral Te well publicised visit of the Military Wives Choir (proud holders of last year’s Xmas Number 1


melding the old into the new, bringing you a powerful programme of rich harmony, rhythm and song.


And so, so much more! All I have been able to give you here is a taster of some of the many bands and acts that will appear at the Festival. As always there will be bands and acts that stand out from the crowd. If last year’s performance is anything to go by the Kagemusha Taiko Drummers will leave anyone lucky enough to catch them on the bandstand breathless. Te boundlessly energetic Kagemusha Taiko lads and lasses will be leading a workshop at the Flavel and as tickets are free you will want to come early so you don’t miss out! Having seen their performance at Sidmouth Music festival I can promise you that RSVP Bhangra is bound to get the whole place up and dancing and I for one can’t wait to see Dartmouth “Bhangraing“ the afternoon away! We’ve also been able to attract


Red Priest, the only Early Music group in the world to have been compared in the press to the Rolling Stones, Jackson Pollock, the Marx Brothers, Spike Jones and Cirque du Soleil! Tis extraordinary acoustic foursome has been described by music


critics as ”visionary and heretical”, “outrageous yet compulsive” and a “break- all-rules, rock-chamber


slot!) will be quite something for the DMF crowds and not to be outdone the men are getting in on the act with the Neath Male Voice Choir, performing at the Guildhall and Flavel. Te Devon Youth Wind Orchestra will also be at Flavel and if you prefer a more sedate pace why not drop in for the Flavel’s ever popular Tea Dance. St Clements Church will also host a


choral event this year with a visit from Te Lost Sound, a cappella mixed voice chorus led by Sandra Smith. Tey are a contemproary choir who re-ignite ancient melodies with a modern twist,


concert approach to Early Music”. Founded in 1997, and named after the flame- haired priest, Antonio Vivaldi, Red Priest has given


several hundred sell-out concerts in many of the world’s most prestigious festivals. Tey will be performing in the magnificent St Saviour’s Church on Saturday May 12th. Needless to say that whatever you


see will be an experience and no doubt this year’s festival, like all the others before it will leave you with a raft of happy memories and looking forward to next year! Tickets for many of the events from Dartmouth TIC (01803 834224). Visit www.dartmusicfestival.co.uk for all festival details.


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Belshazzar’s Feast with their witty banter are bound to entertain


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