This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
came interested in hobby beekeeping over 8 years ago and added beekeeper and honey websites to portfolio of website designs.


“My websites (either designed and/or hosted by me) are most all


found at: http://denrig.com/alvamall.html. “My more modern websites which are more representative of my


work are nursery, plant, and fruit websites (non-beekeeping): http://rare-tropical-fruit.com/; http://floridanativeplantseeds.com/ and http://elatanatives.com/


“My honey websites are much older designs, but the companies


say they don’t want modern updates, because their honey custom- ers are used to the old-fashioned designs. http://walkerfarmshoney.com; http://curtishoney.com Of course I have our local association website which is beekeeping related: http://swfbees.com. And my own website which is bee related: http://honeybeeman.com.”


The front page on the web site is worth the setup cost alone. It features the usual events, calendars, queen information, 4-H essay contest, and Chris Stalder’s FSBA Speakers Bureau and recipe for


“honey Madeleine Tea Cakes.” Detailed statistics for the site are included, something I have not seen elsewhere. Finally, take a look at the videos on the front page, including one on Hopguard application, the beekeeper-prisoner initiative, and others.


There is much more on the site, including a “member’s only” sec- tion with self-fillable forms for the growing number of local associ- ations that are being created. Take a look at the map that shows where associations are located in the state, and how each matches up in terms of FSBA membership. Perhaps most innovative is an application on the front page I have not seen elsewhere called “The Bee Class.” As one passes the mouse over pictures, the view auto- matically zooms to very high magnification . See branched hairs on a honey bee like never before!


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