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FOCUS CONTAINERISED DATA CENTERS


Issue 1, December 2008


MODULAR DATA CENTER - SUN MICROSYSTEMS


SUN MODULAR DATA CENTER Length Width Height


Shipping Weight Power per rack


Load capacity per rack


Internal operating temperature and humidity (doors closed)


Rack Quantity Rack Units (RU)


6.06m (20ft) 2.44m (8 ft)


2.59m (8ft 6in) <8,165kg (<18,000lb)


12.5kW standard per rack; 25kW "high power option" for payload racks 862 kg (1900 lb.)


10°C to 35°C (50°F to 95°F) and 20% to 80% relative humidity (RH), noncondensing


S20 – Eight racks: seven for payload and one for network and internal control equipment D20 – Seven racks: six for payload and one for network and internal control equipment


40 RU per rack


280 RU in S20, 240 RU in D20 available for IT equipment 25 RU available for network equipment in the infrastructure rack 15 RU reserved for Sun MD monitoring, management, and control equipment


Rack Dimensions


EIA/ANSI (RETMA) standard 19-inch (48.26 cm) EIA RS-310-D


ADVANTAGES


A recent IDC paper (which though referring to IBM’s offering) actually describes the generic advantages of containers. “These datacenters can be literally drop shipped to any interior or exterior location where network and utility connections exist. This type of datacenter can be made available in as little as 12 weeks and can incorporate a variety of vendors' equipment, beyond just IBM systems. Retrofitting existing data centers to account for the increasing density of servers and storage devices has become something of a science project for many customers as there is no simple to solution for the more than 10,000 individual enterprise class data centers worldwide. The list of solutions and “best practices” for solving today’s data center challenges is long and varied, which is typical of any emerging market where solutions quickly become fractured due to lack of standards.


IDC believes that the datacenter of the future will increasingly default to a standardized design and that a data center “blueprint” will become a requirement for most companies to optimize the economics of the data center.”


Advantages will include: Time to market: From the time a datacenter is scoped to the time it is built, many customers have already retired a generation of technology; Lower risk: As most datacenters are planned for a 20-25 year lifecycle, capacity planning from a business and systems perspective becomes imperative. A standardized datacenter has a pre-defined load capacity that guarantees power and cooling support, and its modular design allows space to be built on an as-needed basis. Pay as you grow, shorter payback period and enhanced management and predictability, high density as a design point: The data center will increasingly support high density systems such as bladed servers and storage systems. This modular approach makes high density a feature rather than a problem; Simulation: As the future data center becomes more predictable, it opens up the opportunity to build tools that can perform “what-if” scenarios.


34 www.datacenterdynamics.com


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