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Issue 2, February 2009


FOCUS NEWS NORTH AMERICA


SEARCH GIANT Google is expanding its 220-acre site in Lenoir, North Carolina, with the acquisition of six parcels of land west of the main site, totalling approximately 60 acres, the company said. The acquisition has been part of Google’s plan since the company decided to construct a $600m data center in Caldwell County, Lenoir. Google’s North Carolina campus will total approximately 280 acres. Google purchased the property for $3.13m.


HORIZON DATA Center Solutions won a strongly contested government contract with the US Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), a multi-channel retailer with annual revenues of nearly $10bn. AAFES selected Horizon after completing a comprehensive RFP among major data center providers throughout the United States. The contract is based on space in one of Horizon’s two Dallas, Texas-based data centers, which combined provide more than 37,000 square feet of Tier III space, and is estimated at $47m, according to Horizon.


US HEALTHCARE insurance firm Highmark signed IBM for a data center transformation project. IBM used its Mobile Measurement Technology (MMT), which measures 3D temperature distributions for a data center energy efficiency assessment and a thermal analysis to discover where improvements are needed within Highmark’s data center.


APC KITS OUT LAS VEGAS SUPERNAP


APC was a key equipment supplier for SuperNAP, the world’s highest density data center and the newest colocation facility from Switch Communications Group LLC.


Located in Las Vegas, with a footprint of more than 407,000 square feet of space, SuperNAP (Network Access Point) provides mission-critical data storage for government, healthcare, banks and retailers.


With the Switch


Communications-owned 250 MVA substation and building 1, consisting of 146 MVA of diesel generator capacity, for redundancy Switch uses APC’s Symmetra MW II uninterruptible power system


eBay has agreed to develop its next-generation data center in the state of Utah. The center will use systems including a water side economiser that uses outside air to cool water versus motorised chillers, and variable speed drives to run fans and chillers on an on- demand basis. Rainwater will be used to supply the cooling tower and for landscape irrigation.


Salt Lake City-based colocation supplier Center 7 completed its acquisition of Tier Four, a fellow colocation provider. The completion prompted a name change from Center 7 to C7 Data Centers.


Also in Salt Lake City, financial services firm Zoot, which provides credit decisions and loan organisation, has activated a Tier IV data center. Zoot has an existing Tier IV data center and a Tier III facility in Billings, Montana. The new location creates a broader connection to the telecommunications grid and provides a higher level of redundancies.


WASTING WATTS?


Find out how to unleash your stranded capacity, do even more with less and balance data center productivity with effi ciency at the 7th Annual New York DatacenterDynamics Conference and Expo.


NEW YORK- MARCH 04 2009 To register visit www.datacenterdynamics.com/newyork or contact Chris Collins 1-800-922-7249 www.datacenterdynamics.com 5


(UPS) to supply 84 MVA of power and ensure its customers 100 percent uptime.


In addition, at full build, SuperNAP will house more than 7,000 APC NetShelter SX racks and thousands of APC rack mounted power distribution units (PDUs) that enable increased management and efficiency across the data center.


Rob Roy, CEO, Switch Communications Group LLC, said: “Clearly, with a project as large in scale as the SuperNAP facility, we cannot risk using power systems or racks that aren’t equipped to handle the most complex, power-hungry applications. The Symmetra MW II UPS and the APC PDUs


NEW BUILD


T-Systems, a subsidiary of Deutsche Telekom, is opening a new, 35,000 square foot data center in Tempe, Arizona – its ninth US site. The company is working with Digital Realty Trust.


Separately in Springfield, Massachusetts, a $76m data center was announced by the state government. The location is a former high school, ending a long debate about where to house the state’s second data center.


CANADA


IT startup Bastionhost’s plans to create a Dataville data center infrastructure in Nova Scotia were boosted after it entered into a purchase and sale agreement with the Colchester Regional Development Agency (CoRDA) for a number of properties on the outskirts of Truro, Nova Scotia. The properties include a former government continuity HQ bunker, engineered to withstand atomic bomb shockwaves. The 45-year-old bunker features geothermal cooling, a


Entering Las Vegas


address the needs of large data centers and facilities like ours.”


Unlike most centers of its kind, SuperNAP does not rely on raised floors or liquid cooling systems to cool its equipment; the facility utilizes a patented, industry leading HVAC design that allows it to provide as much as 1,500 watts per square foot - more than three times the industry standard.


sophisticated air filtration system, and triple redundant backup power engineered to military specs.


Canadian corporate clothing provider Ash City bought a modular data center from IBM for its new headquarters building – and it was built in less than one week. The new facility uses chilled water cooling while reducing energy consumption by half, the company said.


Canadian telecoms company Bell Canada Enterprises completed three data centers in the latest step in the build-out of its National Hosting Services managed data centre infrastructure portfolio. The data centers were based on APC by Schneider Electric equipment using a rack-based architecture integrated with APC InfraStruXure power and cooling components. They include multiple MGE Galaxy UPS modules, which isolate and protect against power quality disturbances, as well as 150kW InfraStruXure Power Distribution Units. The facilities are located in Calgary, Toronto and Montreal.


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