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NAVY NEWS, MAY 2002 Helping Mantis


All matrons together at RAF Home


THE DIRECTORS of Nursing Services for the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force met together for the first time at Princess Marina House, the residential care and convales- cence centre run by the RAF Benevolent Fund. The purpose of the visit was


to meet student nurses from all three Services who are being trained in care of the elderly at the RAF home. The training arrangement


has proved a great success, popular with residents and staff.


• Group Captain Annie Reid, Colonel Bridget McEvily and Captain Mick Bowen consider a different mode of transport to tour Princess Marina House.


THE NAVAL CLUB


• Well placed in the heart of Mayfair, the Naval Club provides a comfortable and secure environment where members can feel at home.


• The Club has a range of reasonably priced bedrooms, with special weekend rates. The magnificent Dining Room is open for all meals, and private function and meeting rooms are available.


• It is NOT necessary to have been a Naval Officer to become a Member. We welcome all those with an interest in maritime affairs and the sea in general.


• Ladies welcome, both as members and as guests. For more information visit our website at


www.navalclub. co.uk or contact


Commander John Prichard, Royal Navy, Chief Executive,


on 020 7493 7672, Fax: 020 7355 2644 email: cdr@navalclub.co.uk


SERVICES TRAVEL CENTRE At RAF BRAMPTON -


GPTN: 95331 7936 & 7834


Tel: 01480 436655 : Fax: 01480 436653 E-Mail: travei@servicestravel.co.uk Website: www.servicestravel.co.ilk


DISCOUNTED PRICES FOR


FLIGHTS - FERRIES - CAR HIRE - INSURANCE - AIRPORT PARKING. ABTA, ATOL & IATA LICENSED


Little Miss Chatterbox silenced


WITHIN a few short weeks of joining the Royal Navy, Jennifer Conning (17) was nicknamed by her class-mates at HMS Raleigh "Little Miss Chatterbox". Not down-hearted, this young


woman took up the title and turned it into charity cash. With the support of Raleigh


Slow road to Stanley


whole days, and bagged a total of £241.20 for Pudsey's charity. Jennifer is now to be found in Portsmouth in the Second Sea Lord's Administration offices - if you were wondering at the increase in noise level!


RELIVING the route taken by 45 Commando and 3 Para some 20 years ago, nine men and one woman from HMS Leeds Castle walked and yomped the challenging route from Port San Carlos to Stanley in the


Falkland Islands over the course of four days. Expedition organiser, CWEA Lee Broster, explains: "The initial catalyst for the idea of the expedition was a period of non-habitability on the ship. However, it quickly became a challenging and worthwhile evolution of which I am proud to


the San Carlos River to Chata Creek, then the next two days cov- ^-^^^^^^_ ered the distance to the base of ^^ Mount Kent. On the last day, the team


dropped off by British International helicopter to start their expedition. The first day was a trek across country and through


climbed Goat Ridge then on to Tumbledown, before the final downhill into Stanley and their ultimate destination, the cheerful and welcoming Globe Tavern. "I was


have been a part." With lighter packs and better weather, the group were


> The lonely peak of Mount Tumbledown calls on walkers from HMS Leeds Castle.


the conflict and wished to take part in the yomp to try to, in a small way, experience something of what the Land Forces went through just in crossing the Falklands on foot." PO (AH) Mark Smith adds:


Broadsword as an Able Seaman Sonar during the Falklands War" recalls one walker, RPO 'Fez' Parker. "I still have vivid memories of


"The high point, personally and (almost) geographically, was the climb to the peak of Mount Tumbledown and the realisation of the magnitude of individual efforts 20 years ago." Team members achieved over


serving on HMS


teaching staff, Jennifer sought sponsorship for an uncharacteris- tic silent spell in aid of Children in Need. Her mute period lasted for 3


the submariners go help out at the school where his four-year- old son is a pupil.


endurance race of 300 laps at a Southampton track. Registration is £10 and mini-


a Go-Karting 2'A hour


mum charity sponsorship is £250. Contact: Events 023 8033 7333.


approached the Navy? Because it wants people to


• Jennifer Conning.


• THE ROYAL National Institute of the Blind admits it is looking for 300 crazy people so why's the charity


minimum charity sponsorship of £75. Contact: 023 8023 5469.


Guildhall Square. Registration is £10, with


abseil down the side of Portsmouth Civic Offices in mid-June


in a carnival


• PERHAPS inspired by TV makeovers, Plymouth sub- mariners from HMS Trenchant have transformed Woodlands School in Whitleigh with tidy gardens and a fresh coat of paint. CPO Ian Larkin suggested


News in brief


• THE BRITISH & International Sailors' Society (BISS) is looking for teams of six drivers to compete in


w ww.na vynews .co .uk


but Mike says he plans to increase that to £3,000. Good luck to him, and keep the money rolling in.


BRNC reach out to local elderly


ing of the Richard Brinsley centre, an addition to the Rowcroft Hospice in Torquay. Naval person- nel from the college and HMS Torquay and HMS Torbay have been involved with the hospice since its foundation 20 years ago.


Dartmouth witnessed an invasion of Naval officers as 22 Senior Upper Yardmen descended on their home brandishing garden implements - turning a wilderness garden into a pristine paradise. BRNC was also out at the open-


THE RESIDENTS at charity-run Abbeyfield Care Home


in


• THE REVEREND Mike Brotherton of RNAS Culdrose is still ploughing his way through his local waters for the Swim for Life campaign for muscular dystrophy. So far the total yield is £2,700 -


THERE'S pirate troubles in the Irish seas, but don't worry about their fearsome looks - these pirates are the fine upstanding lads from HMS Bangor: Lt Paul Guiver, MEM 'Spud' Murphy


£1,200 through direct sponsorship and collections during entertain- ment nights at Mount Pleasant. A night at the Penguin Races made an additional £380 for the chosen charities. It was agreed by the group that


Officer, Lt Cdr Jim Masters said: "I am extremely proud of the members of my snip's company who successfully completed this arduous walk as a tribute to all the men and women who took part in the Falklands Conflict." The ten walkers were: PO Vic


the beneficiaries of this event should be the British Limbless Ex Servicemen's Association and Breakthrough Cancer Research. The


team's Commanding


Ree, AB Dinger Bell, PO Mark Smith, Lt Jim Reid, RPO Fez Parker, Lt James Mansfield, OM Sophie


Whiteley, CPO Lee Broster and PO Nick Kent-Ledger.


Barnwell, PO Kev


and Diver 'Nobby' Clark. The ship's company from the Sandown-class minehunter, which will be the Queen's Golden Jubilee ship for this June's military event, have spent the last year gathering together almost £8,000 for the Clifton Special School in Bangor, Northern Ireland. The cash total was mostly won by a high-speed hike along the notoriously tough West Highland Way in just three days. The walk averaged 32 miles per day through some of the most beauti- ful scenery of the Scottish highlands. This money has gone into buying specialist equipment to give disabled pupils a chance to be mobile - for one six-year-old Gavin Barton, this is the first time in his life that he has been able to move under his own power. The children also got to enjoy a


between the ship and the school, is leaving HMS Bangor soon, but plans to keep in touch with the children, run- ning the Washington marathon next V year to raise money.


pirates' party on board when the ship visited her affiliated port. Lt Guiver, who started the link


• Hikers posing as pirates: Lt Paul Guiver, MEM 'Spud' Murphy and Diver 'Nobby' Clark.


\


• Gavin Barton, aged 6, is now mobile for the first time in his life.


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