This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
sifting through the ash, hoping to fi nd any surviving possession, only to fi nd melted globs of glass, metal, and plastic. We found some heirloom teacups, remnants of my coin collection, and other bits and pieces. But nothing matched the image of that blue cross. While the roof and nearly every single


beam of wood from our home had completely burned away, a shell of partial brick walls— fragile,


cracked, blackened and visibly


leaning—remained. But with no interior structure to support them, they would easily collapse. So I began pushing down a few walls. T e sound of the bricks hitting the ground without the usual forest cover to absorb the echo was eerie and unsettling. Ben wanted to help out, too, and was eager to topple at least one wall, as he saw his Daddy do. T ere was a smaller half-wall still standing that wasn’t tall enough to fall on top of us should something go wrong, so it was a safe choice for Ben to knock over. My brother Dan got a photo of us


knocking that wall down. It’s an image that resonates with me: father and son, working together, demolish a wall of what was, in both Ben and Matthew’s case, the very fi rst home they lived in and, in my and Tracy’s case, the very fi rst home we owned. I know one day, when Ben and Matthew are older, they will look at that photo and wonder. T ey will probably ask us all sorts of questions about what happened the day of the fi re. I’ll tell them what brave little boys they were and how they helped our family by staying calm and getting some of their things out safely. Perhaps we’ll share the memories of what life growing up in that little house in Bastrop was like for us, and what that home meant to our family. We’ll talk about how a home is love. As the walls of memory tumble down, maybe they’ll remember things they may not have thought about since they were young. Maybe I will, too. I hope we’ll all smile and always remem- ber that we are blessed. •


● ● The Ristow family is currently living in a rental home in south Austin while they fi nish the clean-up on their property and decide where they are led to next call home. You can follow their ongoing story on their blog at ristowfamily.wordpress.com.


BRIANNAS Champagne Caper Vinaigrette Salad Dressing is a delightful flavor celebration that’s popping with a fun blend of champagne vinegar, honey, Dijon mustard, and crushed capers. It’s sure to add a dash of unexpected excitement to any salad—not to mention grilled or roasted meats and vegetables.


Champagne Shrimp Salad


1 package frozen, cooked large shrimp, thawed and tails off 1 head lettuce


1 ripe avocado, sliced 3 scallions, chopped


4 slices applewood-smoked bacon, cooked and crumbled


12 oz. BRIANNAS Champagne Caper Vinaigrette


Pour BRIANNAS Champagne Caper Vinaigrette over shrimp in a bowl. Let it marinate in refrigerator for an hour before serving. Arrange lettuce leaves and avocado on plates. Spoon shrimp, with BRIANNAS Champagne Caper Vinaigrette, over lettuce and then sprinkle scallions and bacon over all. If desired, add more vinaigrette. Celebrate your salad! Makes 6 servings.


Raise a toast to great taste.


See more recipes at BriannasSaladDressing.com


©BRIANNAS Salad Dressings 2011 TexasLiVE | Volume 6 Issue 1 59


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76