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DOING BUSINESS WITH... GTW


United States Of America Part One


Doing business with…


Country: United States of America Capital: Washington DC Area: 9,161,966 sq km Continent: North America


Time zones: Eastern Standard Time (GMT+5) Central Standard Time (GMT +6) Mountain Standard Time (GMT +7) Pacifi c Standard Time (GMT +8) Alaska & Hawaii (GMT +10) Internet domain: .us International dialling code: +1


Geographical location: The country shares land borders with Canada and Mexico Climate: Due to its large size and wide range of geographic features, the US contains examples of every global climate Language: English 82.1%, Spanish 10.7%


Population: 313,232,044 (July 2011 est)


Currency: 1$ US Dollar = 100 Cents (January 2012) Euro conversion $ US1.00= €0.76


Jpn ¥ Conversion $ US 1.00 = ¥77.59


£ UK Conversion $ US 1.00 = £0.64


€1.00 = $ US 1.32 ¥1.00 = $ US 0.01 £1.00 = $ US 1.57


Lou Dzierzak


T e US is a massive market for shooting and hunting. But how do you go about tapping into such a rich seam of business? American gun expert Lou Dzierzak considers your options…


I


Lou Dzierzak is a freelance writer with more than a decade of experience writing about outdoor recreation and the sporting-goods industry. Most recently he was editorial director of Sporting Goods Business, Sporting Goods Dealer, Outdoor Business and Performance Sports Retailer. All four are industry- leading American trade publications. He’s published hundreds of articles on iconic outdoor brands, product design innovations, environmental sustainability initiatives, participation trends and speciality retail operations.


Lou Dzierzak E: lkdcom@visi.com


n January 2012, members of the American shooting sports


industry gathered at the 34th annual SHOT Show trade event. While many industries in the US continue to suff er the eff ects of a staggering economy, the show’s 1,600 exhibitors and 60,000 attendees were in very good spirits. According to National


Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) statistics, demand for guns has continued to grow since late 2008. Collectively, American


manufacturers of fi rearms, ammunition, hunting apparel and accessories have experienced 18 consecutive quarters of sales growth. In 2011, sales of shooting


sports-related products reached $4 billion.


T e NSSF notes that the


shooting sports industry employs approximately 180,000 people and its sporting activities contribute $28 billion annually to the US economy. T e US continues to be a


major producer of fi rearms and ammunition used in hunting, target shooting and other shooting sports pursuits. According to the Annual


Firearms Manufacturing and Export Report (AFMER), the top 25 US fi rearm manufacturers accounted for 86 per cent of production. In 2009, Sturm, Ruger &


Company accounted for 17.2 per cent of total fi rearm production in the US, followed by the Smith & Wesson Corporation with 12.3 per cent, Remington Arms Company 11.3 per cent,


Maverick Arms Inc 7.8 per cent, Marlin Firearms Company 5 per cent and Sig Sauer 4.7 per cent.


A growing market T e AFMER report notes that total fi rearm production reported in 2009 (most current numbers available) reached 5,421,617, an increase of 29.6 per cent over 2008. Long guns accounted for 55 per cent of total US production (3,005,802). Breaking that down, rifl es


totalled 2,253,103 (75 per cent) while shotguns totalled 752,699 (25 per cent). Meanwhile, handgun


production showed a total of 2,415,815 units comprising 1,868,268 pistols (77 per cent) and 547,547 revolvers (23 per cent). Firearms and ammunition manufacturing in the US


www.guntradeworld.com 39


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