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COFFEE “When we got our fi rst Gaggia, it was just for


cups of coffee are consumed in the UK every day


70m


espresso and cappuccino, and most of the coffee we sold was actually fi lter,” recalls Becky Urqu- hart, whose family owns The Ceilidh in Ullapool. “Today it all comes from the Gaggia and, like any good bar or restaurant offering proper coffee, we have a big menu of espresso-based beverages. “We have discerning customers, and lots of


them assume that, out here, they won’t get a decent cup of coffee. But we get loads of com- pliments on how good ours is – they just aren’t expecting a top quality espresso or latté.”


ESSENTIAL EQUIPMENT It may seem like a daunting prospect to some operators, but pubs and bars needn’t worry about employing specialist baristas. With the wide range of coffee ma- chines and equipment on the market, it’s easy to supply good quality coffees that the general public are happy to pay a


premium for. Outlets that don’t see


“Once you


have enticed customers with a


good coffee they are more likely to


purchase food”


a regular demand for cof- fee could opt for cafetières as they provide an elegant way to serve coffee without waste, and minimal staff training is required. Where there is a more continuous demand for coffee, a pour-over fi lter coffeemaker may be suitable. This makes coffee using the fi lter-brew method and keeps it hot on a thermostat- ically controlled hot- plate. The only prob- lem with this is that the thermostatic controls of the hotplate break down the oils in the coffee, reducing the quality.


“Coffee should not be left more than an hour


on a hotplate, or else it will taste stewed,” advises Marco Olmi, director of The Drury Tea and Coffee Company. “This requires some discipline amongst staff to remember to throw old coffee away and brew fresh. Of course that can be wasteful, unless your demand is constant.”


34


TWENTIETH FEBRUARY 2012


pub&bar


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