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COFFEE


Selling coffee has its perks


Café-style drinks account for more than 50% of beverages consumed in pubs, so having a premium coffee menu is essential Words: Sarah Welsh


The out-of-home coffee market is big busi- ness in the UK and shows no signs of abating. The rise of the gastropub has seen consumers visiting pubs for things that they would have previously sought from restaurants and cafés. These trends towards café culture, premiumi- sation and convenience, offer publicans the perfect opportunity to capitalise on this con- tinuously expanding market. “A premium, café-style offering has become


a must in order to maintain a competitive edge,” says Martin Thorpe, head of dispense beverage business unit at Nestlé professional. “They add more value for the customer, while the premium price point benefi ts the publican.” Nowadays, consumers are looking for bet- ter quality beverages when eating and drinking


32 TWENTIETH FEBRUARY 2012


out of home, which means the coffee menu needs just as much attention as the rest of an outlet’s offering. “Consumers these days know their coffees, so


even in deepest North Norfolk, operators need to offer a choice,” says Simone Baker, manager of The Gunton Arms in North Norfolk. “We serve a lot of coffees, including latté, cappuccino, es- presso and Americano, and get through 10 to 15 kilos of beans a fortnight.” Many operators have noticed the shift in the


public’s expectations when it comes to drinking coffee out of home. Even if outlets did invest in a machine, they didn’t make full use of its capabili- ties because there simply wasn’t the consumer demand for the speciality coffees that are so pop- ular today.


pub&bar


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