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LIFESTYLE SKIING


LYNGEN ALPS NORWAY Few people associate boats with heading to the pistes, but that is what you get here as you sail through 60-mile-long Arctic fords, home to Norway’s most impressive mountain range, the Lyngen Alps. While they don’t stand as high as their European equivalents (the highest peak, Jiekkevarre, is 1,880m – less than half the height of the Alps’ Mont Blanc at 4,810m) they make up for it with the unique opportunity to descend from summit to sea through virgin powder. Of course, being out in the wilderness means


no ski lifts, so every morning starts early with a breakfast of Nordic cheeses, meats and cereals before an ascent of the mountain. It may be hard work, but the reward? Views of snow-capped peaks as far as the eye can see and acres of white powder dropping right down into the sea. If you’re looking for a trip that is just a short


flight away, but offers an edge-of-the-world experience, this majestic Polar adventure is it.


BEST TIME TO GO: February to April LEVEL: Intermediate/advanced – and fit GETTING THERE: A bespoke seven-day expedition costs from £11,845 per person based on two sharing, excluding flights. This includes a guide and local guiding support team, trip planning, consultation, and all in-country travel, accommodation and meals. Book with Epic Tomato (www.epictomato.com)


KAMCHATKA RUSSIA Fancy skiing a volcano? Kamchatka Peninsula, which lies in the far east of Russia, has 300 of them – 29 of which are active, making for a unique fire and ice experience. Kamchatka has a landmass the size of


Germany, Austria and Switzerland combined, but with a population of around 355,000 it is a world characterised by pure wilderness. At the ski resort you can expect runs of over


3,000m that feel like they go on forever. They may not be very steep, making them perfect for intermediates and for taking in the spectacular scenery, but there are plenty of hair-raising options that are opened up with heli-skiing. Get dropped off on the summit and from


here a guide will lead you past craters of smoking volcanoes, until you can pick your line and float through the powder, right down to the Pacific Ocean. And if it snows too much for you to get out on the slopes one day, you can always


62 businesslife.co February/March 2012


Clockwise from right: Ski Arpa, Chile; Gulmarg, Kashmir; Alyeska, Alaska; and Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. Previous page: The Lyngen Alps, Norway


A RISKY BUSINESS


For out-of-this-world snow conditions, you need to take special precautions and get the right insurance.


1. Adventurous destination? Countries that have experienced political turmoil in the past, such as Kashmir, may have a travel advisory warning issued from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO). If this is the case, you will need specialist travel insurance, the cost of which will vary according to perceived risks. Check your chosen destination status on www.fco.gov.uk, and ask your travel provider about insurance.


2. Get sufficient cover Minimise your risk of getting a hefty medical bill, should you get injured, by opting for a high cover limit – ideally more than £5 million. Hospital stays can soon add up, particularly in places like the US and Canada, and standard policies only cover up to £1 million.


3. Going off-piste Standard policies will not cover heli-skiing or off-piste snow adventures. Once you have found a policy that does cover this, read the small print. Some policies will only cover off-piste in the presence of a qualified guide.


4. Too much snow Not having enough snow will not be a problem with these destinations, but closures due to avalanche risk could be an issue. Check your policy will cover closures due to too much snow.


PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF POWDER QUEST, ELEMENTAL ADVENTURES AND EPIC TOMATO


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