This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BRANDING


It’s all about the


In a congested marketplace, a strong brand presence can be the difference between success and failure. Christian Doherty get to grips with how branding actually works


BRAND D


40 businesslife.co February/March 2012


EFINING WHAT A brand does and why it matters is one of the more pressing questions for modern companies. But ask anyone


in the industry what a brand actually is, and you’ll get any number of different answers. Emma Anderson is a Senior Consultant at


Guernsey-based Orchard PR – in her view, the brand is the public face of the company. “That involves everything from the name and the logo through to the culture of the business. It’s the ethos the business demonstrates through everything it does – from PR and advertising, to the way in which the individuals within that business conduct themselves,” she explains. The increasing importance and profile


of brands, and the industry that has grown up around advising companies on brand strategy,


has led to a mistaken perception that a great brand can be created by simply coming up with a snazzy logo and tagline. Stories are rife of firms spending millions on a new logo that does little to enhance their standing or profile. Probably most notable in the financial


sector is Abbey National’s infamous rebrand to The Abbey in 2003 (prior to the company being bought by Banco Santander). An estimated £15 million was spent on a new logo and communications, with the catchphrase ‘Turning banking on its head’. Sadly, the only thing turned on its head was its business, which plummeted after the new approach, and range of products, was launched. Even those brands that use customer


insight and crowdsourcing can still get it wrong. US retailer Gap demonstrated the perils of ‘updating’ a classic. Its new logo, developed


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112