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COVER STORY


Top of the chops


The most popular cosmetic procedures with men are:


• Nose reshaping (rhinoplasty)


• Eyelid surgery and eye lifts (blepharoplasty)


• Liposuction (for ‘love handles’ and belly)


• Microsuction (for double chin and jowls)


• Ear reshaping (otoplasty) • Breast reduction (gynaecomastia) • Hair transplantation


And the most popular non-surgical procedures are: • Botox


• Soft tissue fillers for lines around the mouth area


• Laser hair removal, especially to reduce hair on the back


• Chemical skin facial peel (microdermabrasion)


According to Dr Gertrude Huss, Clinical Director of the Jersey-based Hill Street Clinic, which practices both cosmetic dentistry and non-surgical medical aesthetics, there are two types of cosmetic surgical procedures that are on the rise. “First of all there is cosmetic enhancement which is to make something look better and someone more attractive, such as a chin implant,” she explains. “Then there is cosmetic correction, which is the improvement of a facial area due to structural imbalance or changes as a result of ageing. Examples of this are rhinoplasty [nose job], blepharoplasty [eyelid surgery], and facelifts.” The increasing number of men having


cosmetic surgery doesn’t come as a great surprise to Dr Huss, especially when it comes to improving employment prospects. “Pure vanity can be a driving force for certain male patients,” she explains. “But in many instances they feel the need to compete with other younger and more attractive male colleagues. There could also be a sexual motivation in looking more attractive, which adds a further dimension to the commonly held belief that men appear more attractive to women by being intelligent, powerful and rich.” Harley Medical


22 businesslife.co February/March 2012


Group’s Louise Braham agrees with Huss about the importance of a toned and youthful look in the work place, particularly with senior management. “I wouldn’t say that the nature of someone’s looks overall determines a man’s ability or potential success,” she says. “However, in a world where the awareness of aesthetics has grown and job security isn’t guaranteed, looking fresh and well is important when a man is at the top of his game.”


Under the knife So just who is having this work done? Cosmetic treatments may have become more affordable – non-surgical procedures can start at just a few hundred pounds – but surgery itself can still run into thousands of pounds and more. Contrary to what some may think, however,


cosmetic surgery is not the sole domain of chiselled Hollywood actors, fashion entrepreneurs, Hugo Boss-suited media dudes and the pampered, rarefied few. At the Hill Street Clinic, because of its location in Jersey – where the main employer is the finance industry – successful, straight-up-and-down businessmen are the clinic’s mainstay. Of course, it’s all well and good for men


to slap on moisturiser and a bit of fake tan, but it is still quite a leap going under the knife. It’s probably fair to say, however, that much of the rise in cosmetic surgery has been driven by the cult of celebrity and the proliferation of successful men who have had ‘work’ done. “Celebrities like


Wayne Rooney, Simon Cowell and Jason Gardner, among others, have been quite open about procedures they have had done,” says Braham. “Political men in


power – Vladimir Putin, David Cameron, Tony Blair – who have opted for non-surgical procedures have also undoubtedly contributed to the general acceptance that it is okay to undergo procedures and treatments to look more aesthetically pleasing to the public.” You can also add to this list Gordon Ramsey,


who had his chin ‘filled’; Duncan Bannatyne, who admits to having his eye bags ‘done’; and, if the online scandalmongers are correct, it seems that Mr Putin has had a lot more than non-surgical procedures. Did someone say full facelift, cheek fillers and brow-lift? However, while the list of male celebrities


who have had cosmetic work done grows, there have been, unfortunately, an equal number of celebrities who have got carried away – step forward David Gest, Mickey Rourke and Pete Burns as some of the more dramatic vanity car crashes. Yes, you might want to look fresh and ‘lifted’, but no shareholder is going to enjoy having Frankenstein’s Monster at the head of the boardroom table, so keep it real. This is, perhaps, advice that Mike Jeffries, CEO of Abercrombie and Fitch should have listened to. With men and women now looking to stay


ahead of the game, one can only wonder what might come next. As with fashion, only the most up-to-the-minute and exotic will do. Now the hottest cosmetic treatment to hit the high street – brace yourself! – is the non-surgical bee venom facial that ‘freezes’ the face in a youthful glow. Invented by one of the UK’s leading beauty therapists, Deborah Mitchell, the treatment reportedly has met with Royal approval from The Duchess of Cornwall and a bevy of celebrities. You couldn’t make it up. n


THOM O’DWYER is a freelance beauty and fashion writer


Choosing the right surgeon


Here are a few basic guidelines to follow if you decide to have cosmetic surgical procedures:


• Choose a reputable clinic and surgeon • Ensure your surgeon is accredited with FRCS (Plast)


• Check your surgeon is on the General Medical Council’s specialist register of plastic surgeons


• Seek the opinions of previous patients, if possible • Be ultra-cautious of cosmetic surgery ‘package deals’ abroad


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