This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
changes with the seasons. There is a time to plan and a time to plant, mainly determined by the weather – and the finished product is very often a reflection of the gardener’s own personality. While plants form the basis for the


A


majority of gardens, there is so much more to outdoor spaces these days. For the uninitiated, this can often lead to confusion over what is best for your own space – but don’t worry: help is at hand!


The room outside The idea of the ‘room outside’ – having your outdoor space as an addition to your internal living space – has been around for many years now. Long gone are the days when simple borders, rectangular lawns and carpet bedding were the staple of the British garden. Modern life comes with modern


stresses and for many, spending time in the garden, be it toiling or relaxing, helps create a sense of calm. The garden has become another room – a place to de-stress, relax and enjoy the company of friends and family. And that’s why people are spending a lot of time making sure they create a space that is perfect for them. Creating the inside/outside feel to


your property is relatively straightforward if you follow a few golden rules:


n Link your internal and external floor areas by using the same material, or as close a match as possible. Limestone and sandstone work well both inside and out, and Balau and Iroko decking are a close match for light oak inside flooring. n Keep the threshold between the inside and outside clutter-free to trick the eye into seeing just one space – albeit one divided by doors or windows. n Don’t create two dining areas immediately next to each other inside and out – it will result in a confusion of table


A Hanse Haus pre-manufactured home


S ANY KEEN gardener knows, tending your outside space is a year-round love affair that


Long gone are the days when simple borders, rectangular lawns and carpet bedding were the staple of the British garden


and chair legs and will detract from the scheme. Instead, if you access your garden through a dining room or an area of the kitchen with a dining table, use outdoor lounge furniture in the adjacent part of the exterior space instead. Something chunky and low always works well.


Get the balance right Making the most of all the available outdoor space you have can be a challenge, especially if you are restricted by size. If you’re not employing the services of a garden designer, then an accurate survey, compass, a ruler and piece of graph paper on which to draw a scaled version of the space are vital. These simple tools will allow the bones of the scheme to be laid out, furniture decided upon and areas defined. It is the resulting happy balance


between hard and soft landscaping that will create a stunning space that can be used all year round, and if you’ve undertaken the planning and works yourself, then the sense of achievement when all is complete is immense. When thinking about plants, a balance


of 70 per cent evergreen to 30 per cent transient will provide a good basis for a space that has interest all year round. Don’t be fooled into thinking that evergreen means dull. Callistemon citrinus, all manner of Phormium, Cistus and Hebe


February/March 2012 PS 27





Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112