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The ECO-POWR


motor system is said to use up to 32 per cent less electricity


electricity than industry standard AC & DC motors, ECO-POWR treadmills are proven to not only save money for health club owners, but can also support environmentally- conscious facilities while still delivering optimum performance levels,” explains Mark Turner, managing director for SportsArt Fitness UK. WOODWAY has taken this one


step further by developing a series of non-motorised treadmills, which require zero electricity to function. The CURVE treadmill allows users to generate their own speed on a patented running surface and near- frictionless drive system. Users can, it is claimed, benefit from enhanced stamina and running technique, while the CURVE also provides club owners with a ‘green’ treadmill option.


something different One of the most innovative developments outside of the conventional uses of a treadmill is the creation of the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill. Devised from Differential Air Pressure technology, the AlterG is used predominantly for rehabilitation, treatment of neurological conditions and weight and aerobic training. “Air in a pressure-controlled chamber


gently lifts the user,” explains chartered physiotherapist and clinical specialist for AlterG, John Hammond. “Studies have shown that our anti-gravity treadmill can help decrease ground reaction forces in walking and running, which encourages the restoration of normal gait mechanics – vital for optimal recovery.” A further development in treadmill


design is seen in the FreeMotion Incline Trainer. While almost all treadmills


february 2012 © cybertrek 2012


The AlterG Anti-Gravity model uses air pressure to take the strain off users


Treadmill manufacturers


are posed with the challenge of minimising injury risk


will have an inbuilt capacity to alter the incline of the running deck, the Freemotion Incline Trainer can be programmed for a variation of between 3 per cent decline up to 30 per cent incline. Increasing muscular activity at slower speeds, the FreeMotion Incline Trainer is proven to activate 50 per cent more leg muscles and 100 per cent gluteal activation. But innovation doesn’t only come


in the functional mechanics of a piece of kit. CYBEX International’s Pink Treadmill campaign is an example of how the product can be used to achieve a wider objective. Health clubs and gyms can purchase a special pink treadmill from CYBEX, which then becomes part of its annual Pink Ribbon Run; money is donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation for every mile clocked on the treadmill in the month of October. “Our Pink Ribbon Run campaign uses


a professional quality treadmill that will withstand the most demanding environments and challenging workouts. Not only do the users get all of the benefits from exercising, but they also get the opportunity to do more with their workout time,” comments Lisa Juris, vice president of marketing for CYBEX International.


so what’s next? Manufacturers will continue to transform their products in line with the latest fitness trends, technological developments and consumer demands. Set to revolutionise the industry


in 2012, WOODWAY is planning to launch a new range of treadmills that will allow users to actually generate power from their workout. Meanwhile, Matrix’s latest product


innovation is a sign of what’s to come across the board. Already featured in the Matrix 7 Series, Virtual Active™ programming incorporates real video footage of routes throughout varying terrains and locations, while the machine’s incline alters accordingly. This is yet another example of the continually evolving technology that’s engaging users in a heightened interactive experience, thereby encouraging longer and more regular workouts. While the demand for treadmills


will always exist, the challenge for manufacturers is to continue to develop and innovate, thus ensuring that treadmills maintain their core position in any exercise routine.


healthclub@leisuremedia.com lauren applegarth


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 47


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