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be stretched to a point where I would have expected it to be ruined, but it wasn’t. Because it has a memory, the material returns to its original shape when ironed. In addition, Siser says there says is absolutely no loss of colour when washed 25 times at 40°C. I thought the metallic vinyls we were shown were striking. P.S.


Metallic, which has a shiny chrome look to it and contains an aluminium foil, is ideal for short-term promotional products. Some of Siser’s P.S. Electric range look truly fantastic and appear very metallic, but without the reflective mirror like shine some vinyls have and suitable for long term use. Another especially interesting product I discovered at the


Grafityp workshop was Grafiflex 3D XPD, a CAD cut material that expands when heated, revealing a 3D texture. By varying the time and pressure used in heating the 3D XPD, a wide range of surface effects, such as embroidery, chenille fabric and high-relief can be achieved. Available in white, black, yellow, green, royal blue and red, this material can be applied on top of existing layers and is ideal for combining with other products to create unusual decorations. I found the day really informative and recommend attending a


Grafityp Textile Materials Workshop to any signmaker or graphics professional doing this type of work, or considering it. Information videos can be found at www.siser.it/en/video; the


next workshop is planned for spring, contact Grafityp to book your place, tel. 01827 300500 or go to www.grafityp.co.uk


Black gloss vinyl on top of P.S. Electric Yellow was used to create this insect with a striking metallic appearance.


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