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Making shops secure


36


www.a1retailmagazine.com


Kieran Kennedy, Technical Manager at Ingersoll Rand Security Technologies, examines the best ways of marrying aesthetics and function with high performance security for retail premises.


Recent unprecedented social events have focussed on the design and protection of shop fronts. More than ever before, these events have shown just how vulnerable many premises can be against prolonged and determined attack. Of course no building can be guaranteed to be 100% invulnerable, but what can be guaranteed is a degree of security that is sufficient to deter, delay and put off the determined criminal.


Design Shopfronts are not merely the entrance to a store. They help to develop an image of the store itself and can also be a component in creating the character of a town, city or shopping centre. Part of the problem in securing these premises stems from the way shopfronts are now designed, especially where the trend in larger premises is openly inviting entrances coupled with large areas of glass and minimum metalwork within the body of the shopfront. Obviously, this can create inherent weak points and invite opportunity for attack. Unlike other commercial


buildings, in the retail world there has to be a carefully conceived marriage between aesthetics and function. Security arrangements need to appreciate this whilst providing a structure that is safe from attack. The shopfront is an invitation to entice people to look and then enter; the entrance door system is the facilitator. Automatic doors are the best way to encourage traffic inside because they offer no resistance or effort. They are equally user friendly for those with disabilities as they are for people carrying shopping bags or pushing children in buggies. They also provide a screen against external noise pollution and the weather and, importantly, help to minimise heat loss emissions. However, despite all these benefits, the reality is that a primary function of any entrance door is security, and when the shop is closed, this becomes the paramount concern. Varying options exist for out of hour’s security, such as roller shutters to deter ram-raiders, which can be included without affecting the aesthetic appeal.


safe and secure Making shops


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