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Lighting can play an important role in creating an optimum environment, and in turn enhance people’s wellbeing, especially when it comes to learning. Lighting has been shown to have a significant effect on our mood, our energy levels and our ability to concentrate


Lighting has the amazing ability to alter a person’s mood, and any lighting designer will confirm that bright lights are suitable for some settings, and softer lighting is more appropriate for others. This has been a given in lighting homes for a long time, but what the industry has slowly begun to develop is a concrete argument for the same approach to lighting to stimulate levels of attention and concentration – particularly in schools. Given the potential of targeted lighting schemes in schools, it is no wonder that Philips Lighting UK have set to work creating an ideal system. Lee Bensley, Director of Indoor Lighting Solutions at Philips UK explains why the company is so passionate about the SchoolVision system; “Lighting can play an important role in creating an optimum environment, and in turn enhance people’s wellbeing, especially when it comes to learning. Lighting has been shown to have a significant effect on our mood, our energy levels and our ability to concentrate”. With this in mind, Philips has developed SchoolVision, a system with with four different settings, each aimed at enhancing the learning environment for different requirements. “SchoolVision is based on the idea that


different tasks require different levels of energy and concentration” continues Bensley. “SchoolVision’s four settings - Normal, Energy, Focus and Calm – each producing lights of different colour and intensity to create the best atmosphere for a particular task.” This can have a very positive affect on pupils, who respond to the different lighting levels with positive


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changes in mood. Schools are slowly beginning to understand the benefits of good LED lighting, and hopefully more schools will take this up in the future. Bensley is hoping that schools will see the benefits of the technology; “With increasing pressure on school budgets funding is one of the key barriers that needs to be addressed to ensure more pupils in the future can benefit from innovative lighting solutions.” As Philips SchoolVision shows, lighting in schools is very important. For schools that specialise in teaching autistic children, who are very sensitive to the flickering of some conventional fluorescent lighting, the importance of the correct lighting scheme is even more essential. In these instances, lighting needs to be carefully considered to ensure the comfort and safety of students.


Former SLL Young lighter of the year, Ruth Kelly, recommends that lighting schemes need to avoid glare, with plain blinds used to prevent the dazzle of outside lighting. Austrian based lighting company Zumtobel were asked to create a lighting scheme for Yeoman Park School based in Nottingham. This is a special school with nearly half of the 94 pupils having autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Zumtobel were asked to create a lighting solution that would be comfortable for the pupils, some of whom also experience learning difficulties or challenging behaviours, meaning the lighting scheme needed to be suitable to ensure pupils would not be over stimulated.


Zumtobel installed an Emotion Touch active lighting ceiling, which features clusters of recessed Lightfields luminaires





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