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Royal Navy Officsrs' UNIFORMS


AND PLAIN CLOTHES


are Perfectly Tailored by BERN ARDS


40 COMMERCIAL ROAD PORTSMOUTH


No. 1 JUNE 1954 PORTSMOUTU Navy N(!WS The Official Newspaper of the Portsmouth Command p


H.M.S. ALBION is an aircraft carrier of the Hcnnes class and the sixth ship in the Royal Navy to bear this name. She was commissioned at Walisend-


on-Tyne on May 24. 1954. under the command of Capt. G. H. Rule. D.S.O.. O.B.E.. and is on a General Service


Commission. The ship has been built by Messrs.


Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson


Ltd., at Wailsend-on-Tyne. The keel was laid down in 1944 but after the end of the war the work of building was slowed down and it was not until


4 ever, as a result of the outbreak of the win Korea. work was started again at full pressure and continued until the ship was finished


Aircraft anugeestl


The primary function of an aircraft carrier, of course, is the operation of


aircraft. With the rapid development of jet aircraft and their introduction into the Service it became essential to


design a ship with a landing area which ouW be clear forward and have no


.ifety barriers. The flight deck of IM.S. Albion was therefore angled


11.%1.S. Albion on full-power trial degrees to port. There are six


arrester wires spaced equally along the line of the angled deck. If an air-


This is a Special ROYAL TOURNAMENT Number


Articles and Photographs appear on the centre puge' "NAVY NEWS" takes this opporfuniy


of wishing Portsmouth Gun Crew every success at Earl's Court


craft fails to booki wire on Iandinc it can immediately, and without diffi-


culty, take off again. This was not so in the case of earlier deck-landing


arrangements when, if an aircraft


missed the wires, it usually crashed into the safety barrier, sometimes


May 6. 1947. that H.M.S. Albion was launched by Mrs. Attlec. In 1949. how-


H.M.S. Albion, each of which is


capable of launching a heavy aircraft, The catapult, of course, provides a


rapid method of getting aircraft air-


borne without the necessity of turning the ship exactly into the wind. It is also ideally suited for operating high-


high wind speed along the deck is essential for take-off.


Don~ eqpeu* The very latest domestic equipment


has been fitted in the galleys. serveries. etc.. and an up-to-dale laundry should


provide a first-class service Lid.g aecaaodalio


[he main feature of the living accommodation is the provision of bunks on the mess decks. These bunks


with their special mattresses. are more comfortable and hygienic


than hammocks.


The maximum capacity of the living accommodation is 1,650 but the num- ber of officers and men borne under the


present peace-time comp'.ement is about 1,250. This means that the ship's


company is more comfortably accom- modated, as extra space has been made available by the temporary removal of the %pare bunks, All mess decks are lit


by fluorescent lighting. Office accommodation in H.M.S.


Albion is generally çood. All offices have fluorescent lighting and are well


causing a serious accident, the risk of which was increased in the case of jet aircraft.


Two aircraft lifts are provided, each


of which is capable of rapidly raising a heavy aircraft to flight-deck level.


Two hydraulic catapults are fitted in


fitted out. Most of the important offices in the ship are concentrated in


the Office Rat, thus greatly easing the problem of internal distribution of correspondence. etc.


M


All meals are taken in the two dining halls and not on the mess decks. These


performance jet aircraft, whose accel- eration at low altitudes is such that a


Make a po.ns of calling at BERNARDS OFFICERS' SHOP


Whenever you have a CIlthinc Requirement


C. H. BERNARD £ SONS, LID. es .is,ss. a5 r4,iiIaOUiis


Price Threeperc


H.M.S. ALBION~NEW CARRIER JOINS THE FLEET


Latest Improvements in Messing and Accommodation


dining halls are run on the cafeteria system and, with the modem galley and


servery equipment in use, should ensure good, hot meals, freshly cooked food, standard portions and less wast-


ace. Breakfast rolls and all types of' pies can be made in ,,:rid


bakery. It will not be necessary for ratings


to have knives, forks, spoons. etc.. on loan. All these items will be provided


in the dining halls. That all-important beverage. "Stand


Easy Tea" is provided by the Supply Officer and is collected in tea kettles


sugar have to be obtained on repay- ment and are kept in the mess. This tea is drunk in the ratings' own messes.


Every man has his enamel mug which can be washed U ON the mesa deck


(running hot and cold water is provided).


Mew decks Although the mess decks have the


appearance of dormitories and meals are taken in dining halls, an attempt has been made to retain the traditional idea of the small mess where a man


can get to know his mess mates well. This has been done by dividing the


large mess decks into small messes of not more than 30 men.


Adoption Albion is the ancient name of


England and is derived from a Latin word (albus) which describes the colour of the cliffs at the south-eastern


corner of the country. It is therefore


very appropriate that H.M.S. Albion has been adopted by the historic Con- federation of the Cinque Ports


(Dover. Hastings. Sandwich, Romney and Hythe) and the ancient towns of


Winchelsea and Rye.


ALTHOUGH REBUILDING . . - . . . . . . . . .


by one man from each mess; milk and


AT 28. THE HARD S. W. SILVER& CO (SILVER & EDGINGTON, LIMITED)


UNIFORM AND CIVILIAN TAILORS SINCE 1795 WILL WELCOME YOU THERE OR AT ANY OF THEIR BRANCHES WHERE EXCLUSIVE DOESKINS, SUPERFINES AND A VARIETY OF FINE QUALITY SUITINGS MAY BE INSPECTED


-I A I . 4 A - - -- - - 110 W' GM. entertain Pofl .a'sd-gu crew HEAD OFFICE


KING WILLIAM HOUSE, 2a EASTCHEAP, LONDON, ESC.3 AND AT


SOUTHAMPTON " LIVERPOOL " FALMOUTH ...


0 """ "5I


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