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A:


That’s a great question, James. I get asked about this a lot. Your strategy might be acceptable if we lived up north, but unfortunately in North Carolina (or perhaps fortunately), we have frequent warm spells in the wintertime and it gets warm enough for flea, tick and mosquito larvae to hatch. I have pulled a tick off a dog in February, and have been bitten by a mosquito in January. If you let your flea/tick or heartworm medication lapse during the winter months, your dog could become susceptible to bites from any of these pests, which could make your dog vulnerable to heartworm disease, or any of the numerous tick-borne diseases.


In our area of North Carolina, we see many problems from fleas and ticks. Not only do fleas cause skin irritation, but dogs that are allergic to the flea saliva have an allergic skin reaction that can affect their entire body. Ticks carry diseases such as Ehrlichiosis and Rocky Mountain spotted fever that can make your pet (and you) very sick. So my advice is don’t gamble with your flea and tick prevention and treat your pet all year round to be safe.


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The Triangle Dog T Volume 2 • Issue 1


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