This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
most extreme tides are, also known as spring tides. (Neap tide refers to minimal tidal range.) Every 24 hours and 50 minutes, there are two high tides and two low tides. A tide table is published in Coastal View


News, Carpinteria’s weekly newspaper, and tide books are available at Danny’s Deli and Austin’s Hardware, which also sells fishing licenses. Carpinteria has one of the few remaining


salt marsh habitats in North America. Located near Ash Avenue, the Carpinteria Salt Marsh provides a healthy ecosystem for migratory waterfowl, other sea birds, fish and plants. Kauth pointed out that at high tide, from


the vantage point of standing on the rocks, one can see leopard sharks swimming into the salt marsh.


Other environments include an offshore


kelp forest where over 1,000 species make their home, surf grass habitats, pier pilings, and the Carpinteria Seal Rookery. The beach around the seal rookery, east of Casitas Pier, is closed from December through May. “A seal rookery is rare on the coast,” noted


Kauth. “They’re usually on an island off shore.” “The seals are in front of the campground


in summer and fall,” said Marie Lindsey, state park interpreter. “In winter they go to the rookery.” To catch a show of dancing dolphins,


daybreak and just before sunset are the best bets. The chance of seeing whales on their migration to Baja California from Alaska is in winter.


one can see LeoParD sharks sWimming into the saLt marsh.


ABOVE, a winter’s mountainscape is every bit as spectacular as its seascape. The picture was taken in front of the Carpinteria salt marsh.


FALLWINTER2007 23


GRAHAM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116