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amy orozco


Editor and writer Amy Orozco makes her home in downtown Carpinteria with her husband Alonzo. In addition to articles appearing in local publications and on popular Web sites, Amy’s work credits include the Los Angeles Times and the Walt Disney Company. An intrepid international traveler, she loves sending foreign dispatches.


Amy’s favorite continent is Asia, and she always looks forward to coming home to Carpinteria


Back to her Carpinteria roots after a few years in San Diego, Lea Boyd is now the managing editor of the Coastal View News, a contributor to Carpinteria Magazine and Tinta Latina, and a copy editor for DEEP Magazine. When not playing with words she can be found hiking, traveling, cooking veggie meals, enjoying the Pacific Ocean or spending time with her tortoise, Dr. Stebbins.


 lea boyd


Summerland writer and freelance editor Fran Davis is a columnist for Carpinteria’s Coastal View News. She is an avid traveler and has relayed her adventures in two travel anthologies published by Avalon Books. Her essays, fiction and poetry are regularly published in print and online journals.


fran davis james claff ey


Dubliner James Claffey is a writer and educator pursuing a master’s of fine arts degree. His work has been published in Ventana Magazine and Tennis Match Monthly. Currently working on his first novel, the transplanted Irishman hosts poetry readings and facilitates writing workshops.


 dianne armitage maureen foley


Maureen Foley was born and raised in Carpinteria. She has an MFA in Prose from the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University. Her writing has appeared in the New York


Times, Wired, Skanky Possum, Santa Barbara Magazine, New York Post, Santa Barbara Independent and elsewhere.


juli land-marx


Carpinteria resident Juli Land-Marx brings twenty years of graphic design experience to the creation of Carpinteria Magazine. As the owner of Image Net, Juli has been the primary graphic designer for this magazine since its inception. She is pictured here with her most beautiful creation, little Kati, a designer in the making, who you may see waving to passers- by from Image Net’s windows on Maple Avenue.


Dianne Armitage is a freelance writer hailing from Indianapolis. Her writing appears on a number of Web sites, including Oprah, Eat Better America, and The Breast Care Site. Dianne’s articles have been included in MAMM, Tinta Latina and Amoena Life magazines. She currently can be found living, working, playing̶and daydreaming in Carpinteria!


christopher palomarez


A Santa Barbara native, Christopher Palo- marez was immersed in the art field even while growing up. Attended Al Collins Graphic Design School in Tempe, Ariz. Upon graduation, he returned to the central coast beachside life. As a photographer, hobby- ist, and guitarist, there is much to say about creativity within several mediums. Often one blends and accentuates the other. Chris is the Art Director for DEEP Magazine.


gib johnson


Author and playwright Gib Johnson is a long-time Carpinteria resident. Over 30 of his plays have enjoyed successful runs throughout the United States. In addition, he has been a contributor to The New York Times Book Review. He’s a member of The Dramatists Guild.


pen and ink











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