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springsummer2008


18 features


18 hoUSE PARTY Every April, Carpinteria Beautiful hosts the town’s biggest celebration—the Home & Garden Tour, which shows off how beautiful Carpinteria is no matter what scale of real estate you’re at. Genius in its simplicity (the menu is lemonade and cookies), the all-day affair is a time for friends to reunite, neighbors to catch up, and everyone to walk away with plenty of inspiration and design ideas.


37 STYlINg CElEBRATIoNS In our little corner of the world are some of the


fanciest, most talked about social gatherings in the country. Think Oprah’s 50th birthday or the halcyon days of the Reagan era. Behind the glitz, glamour and ruffle of ball gowns is an army of highly trained professionals who ensure events go off without a hitch, and some of those best party givers call Carpinteria home.


50 ExoTICA BoTANICA Some gardeners use a Saturday morning to cap


off a week’s worth of pouring over seed catalogs and plotting landscape designs. For them, Seaside Gardens—with demonstration gardens from five very different ecosystems and a green retail center all rolled into a nursery nirvana—is their weekend destination.


6 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE


66 ART ANd lIfE RICh IN loCAl ColoR For half a century, painter Jack Baker has lived at


Rincon Point, not far from the big picture of his career, tuning into the cycle of life along the coast. His carriage house studio holds a wealth of fine art representing travels circling the globe and colorful phases spanning decades. Educator and mentor to many, bon vivant Jack Baker embraces his world with keen observation of subtle details.


76 VINTAgE CARPINTERIA Sitting at 1,200 feet, Paredon Vineyard is comprised


of four acres of syrah grapes and three acres of grenache grapes, all organically grown. Planted in 2000, the vineyard is an ocean-facing plot with views of Highway 101 and the islands.


89 goINg BACk To lAmBERT fARm Lambert Farm sat at the end of Lambert Road, up


from the polo fields and down from Summerland. The living situation was communal, meals and food from the gardens were often shared, but everyone had their own abode: a boat, a bus or a hand-built cottage in the woods. There was no overriding religious or philosophical dictate, except perhaps to live freely, hang-out well, and make enough money to pay the rent.


DAYKA


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