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ABBOTS LANGLEY BOWLS CLUB Beryl and Charles Cain.


O


ne of the best and certainly the oldest bowler at Abbots Langley Bowls Club is Charles


Cain, 93 years young, and together with Beryl recently celebrated their 65th wedding anniver- sary. The pair met at a dance at Croxley Green


Guildhall, a venue long since gone, and a meet- ing which may not have been had Charles not been allowed in as it was members only. His entry on the night was due to good fortune as a friend vouched for him. This was back in 1940 and shortly afterwards


the war ensured that Charles, as a member of the RAF, was to spend the next four years in India as an armourer for the aircraft deployed to that particular theatre. Charles and Beryl, who spent the war years as


a nurse, remained in touch throughout and mar- ried in 1945. Married life has meant two sons, four grandchildren and, to date, three great grandchildren. Charles, who had trained as a butcher pre-war,


returned to his old job. At the age of 59, whilst the manager of what was then the Cooperative Butcher Shop in Abbots Langley, on the corner of Langley Road and the High Street, he was intro- duced to bowling and has been bowling for Ab- bots Langley Bowls Club for the last 34 years. Beryl took up bowling a year later than


Charles, in 1978, and became rapidly hooked on the sport. Together they have been keen mem- bers of the club ever since. Beryl has been both captain and president of


the Ladies at Abbots Langley Bowls Club and was also the captain of Watford and District Ladies in 1985. Charles has also been both cap- tain and president of the men‘s section of the club and a bowler with Watford and District as well as a Hertfordshire County bowler. Both of them enjoy the social side of the club as


much as the bowling particularly the repartee and card games which are part of the regular Tuesday night ―club nights‖, held all year round in the clubhouse.


78


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