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Concern raised


about plans to elect police chiefs


T


hree Rivers residents have been warned the Government‘s decision to abolish police au-


thorities across the country and replace them with directly-elected police commissioners meant it was necessary for people to become more in- volved in law and order issues. Sue Warman, the Hertfordshire Police Author-


ity‘s lead member for Three Rivers, told those gathered at a public meeting in Croxley Green that the passing of the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act in September would see the 17 member authority disbanded and its powers


‘If the silent majority stay at home we could get a skewed result’


for setting police targets, budgets and appointing the chief constable given to one individual – elected by Hertfordshire residents. The election will be held in November in a


move the Government claims will inject some democracy into policing. Mrs Warman urged people to turn out to vote for their commissioner.


Police will have to answer to directly-elected chiefs later this year.


She said: ―The election will be on Thursday,


November 15, 2012, and the worry is, being a cold November night, if the silent majority stay at home we could get a skewed result.‖ Mrs Warman explained the commissioner, like


any politician, would have a manifesto and would be able to change things quickly if he or she wanted. They will be elected for five years. The checks and balances will be provided by a


20-member panel which will require a two- third‘s majority to veto any of the commissioner‘s plans. This panel was put into the legislation at the insistence of the Lords as it had not ap- peared in the Government‘s original plans. by Dan Hatch


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