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Angry residents say flooding ‘could have been avoided’


R


esidents in Summerhouse Way were angry a burst water main flooded their street and


yards last month, blaming the flooding on a drainage problem they say they‘ve been asking the council to fix for five years. Resident Ken Bleakley said residents were


initially concerned the water bubbling up into the road might have been sewage and claimed the water caused at least one house to lose power. While praising Veolia for quick action in


‘It needn’t have happened if they’d cleaned the drains.


We’ve been telling the council about it for five years’


attending and fixing the problem of the burst main – which has seen torrents of water running down the hill towards the allotments – Mr Bleakley laid the blame for the flooding at the


A burst water main caused flooding in Summerhouse Way last month.


door of Hertfordshire Highways. He said: ―It needn‘t have happened if they‘d


cleaned the drains. We‘ve been telling the council about it for five years.‖ Hertfordshire Highways is an authority of the


county council. A spokeswoman for Hertfordshire Highways


said: ―We regularly clear storm drains in Summerhouse Way, with the last clearance taking place in October. We have also been out to clear a number of individual drains following reports of blockages. ―While we can‘t comment on the particular


drain in question without knowing the precise location, we encourage residents to report problems either online via www.hertsdirect.org/ highwayfaults or by calling 0300 123 4047.‖ Mr Bleakley said he believed the drain on one


side of the road had been cleaned, but not the other.


by Dan Hatch


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