This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
‘Use common sense and keep A & E for emergencies’


H


ospital doctors, nurses and GPs are asking Hertfordshire residents to help ease the


pressure on busy Accident and Emergency de- partments this winter. A&E departments, sometimes known as emer-


gency departments, are designed to treat very serious or life threatening injuries or illnesses, but each day there are a significant number of people who come with minor injuries or illnesses that should be treated elsewhere. David Gaunt, clinical director for emergency


services at West Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust, said: ―Winter is always a busy time for NHS services and emergency departments in particular as we see an increase in the number of people with breathing problems, winter bugs or who hurt themselves in a fall. ―We‘re also seeing an increasing trend in peo-


ple going to emergency departments for help because it is convenient, rather than because it is where they need to come. ―If you have a minor condition like an upset


Watford General Hospital.


stomach, cough or earache, don‘t come to A&E. It is important that we keep A&E for real emergen- cies only.‖ You should always call 999 if someone is seri-


ously ill or injured and their life is at risk. Examples of medical emergencies include chest


pain, difficulty in breathing, unconsciousness, severe loss of blood, severe burns or scalds, chok- ing, fitting or concussion and severe allergic reactions. People are being urged you to think carefully


about getting help from pharmacies, their local doctor or Herts Urgent Care, the GP out-of-hours service, which can be reached on 03000 333 333.


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