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Top cop vows to tackle property crime


T


he village‘s police chief says fighting burglary, theft from cars and shoplifting are


his team‘s priorities for 2012. Sergeant Neil Canning toldMy Abbots News


that due to the economic climate he is focussing on fighting property thefts. He said: ―These are called acquisitive crimes and they will be top of our agenda this year.


‘We’re urging people to secure their back gates, make sure there are no


tools left around the garden that could be used to force entry’


Through crime prevention, regular visible patrols and using intelligence gathered we aim to fight these types of incidents and keep things under control.‖ Sgt Canning also warned drivers who use


their mobile phone while driving that they will be shown no leniency if caught. He said: ―We will continue with our zero


tolerance policy towards people using their phones will driving. It‘s as dangerous as drink driving because the driver‘s attention is elsewhere. If you get caught you will get a £60 fine and three points on your licence.‖ Despite a spate of burglaries in late


Sgt Neil Canning


November and early December burglary was down overall last year by 56 per cent. He added: ―There were five incidents in a two


week period and they followed the same pattern of people trying to gain entry through the back garden. ―We‘re urging people to secure their back


gates, make sure there are no tools left around the garden that could be used to force entry and think about getting rear lighting installed if they haven‘t already.‖


by Jerry Lyons Sgt Canning also welcomed PC Paul Beecher


to the team. He said: ―Paul will be a real asset to the village and to us. He is a very experienced officer with more than 20 years in the police force.‖


by Jerry Lyons


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