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B E


How to cultivate a pioneering spirit! Be open to and excited about possibilities. Have a desire for the thrill, the revelation of the new.


Glenfiddich 14 Year Old Rich Oak $94.99


Have you always revered a challenge? It’s a wonderful thing to let one’s imagination roam. I think I learned early in life that if one can direct it towards realistic possibilities then you can take the next step to bring what you imagined into reality. To bring ideas you dreamed up to reality does require commitment, hard work and discipline - all easier to summon up if you are excited about the end result and the act of creation through your own thinking.


How has this attitude influenced your life? It has been fundamental to everything I’ve ever done and is probably why I’ve never been comfortable in a regular job with set and repetitive tasks!


What is essential to making a dream or ambition a reality? The ability to free your imagination in the first place, then application, commitment and hard work.


What decided Everest as your pinnacle challenge? While climbing a lower mountain nearby I imagined the possibility of climbing it in a lightweight alpine style without oxygen.


How did you approach the difficulties of an uncharted ascent? With caution and imagination.


When dealing with the unknown what are a persons best assets? An open mind and self-belief tempered by humility and previous experience.


How would you describe the feeling of achieving your goal? A mixture of huge relief and the opening of almost endless possibilities.


How vital is training and preparation to all aspects of endeavor? Obviously one has to have all the physical needs dialed – the logistics and technical requirements but these are only part of the preparation. The equally critical aspect is the psychological preparation. You need to have fully engaged your imagination to the upcoming task and have run through all the possibilities of the project in your mind before commencement. This is best conducted under a positive but realistic framework.


What are the key insights from mountaineering which have value to us all? The most obvious is the importance of setting a goal – obviously with a mountain the goal is the summit – a very clear goal!


The only way to climb the biggest mountains is to take one step at a time – look too far ahead and you’ll be overwhelmed by the enormity of the task so just do the job immediately at hand well and if you have a sound plan, the rest will fall into place. Great things can only achieved by application and hard work but one must also revel in that, by loving what you do.


And lastly, to be a successful mountaineer you have to get in tune with the mountains and that means getting in touch with the natural world, being at home there at a very fundamental – I would say even at a subconscious level, it’s really a reconnection because we are all born with it but lose it as we grow up and inevitably have to buckle down to life under the pressures of the human condition.


When you start to reconnect with nature you realize how insensitive we have become to it and our destruction of our planet becomes starkly more evident.


How is Glenfiddich helping preserve and inspire progressive innovation? By recognizing pioneers, promoting their achievements and also giving the concept of pioneering a contemporary relevance, making people realize that pioneering is essential for progress in the human journey, that the way forward can often start off down some dark unpromising alley before it opens out into golden fields.


What do you consider when developing original concepts? Obviously what hasn’t been done – looking for gaps in the ‘market’ and what needs of functions haven’t been catered for. Then having an open mind and being as exhaustively consultative as you can be.


What are the greatest lessons of discovery? Darwin’s idea of natural selection, seems obvious in retrospect and there is always more to discover.


INSPIRATION


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