This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
by Patrick Nothaft COMEDY


At The B.O.B. Grand Rapids, MI 616.356.2000


www.thebob.com


Jon Reep on Being the ‘Hemi Guy’


ANDREW KENNEDY January 5 - 7


W PETE LEE January 12 - 14


RORY SCOVEL January 19 - 21


HETHER THEY LIKE IT OR NOT, some actors will always be synonymous with a single character, regardless of the length of their Internet Movie Database profile. Comedian Jon Reep has been entertaining


audiences since 1995 with his stand-up routine, TV roles and movie appearances, but is most famous as That-Thing-Got-a- Hemi-Guy from the Dodge commercials. “I’ve done three different spe-


JON REEP Dr. Grins, Grand Rapids Jan. 26-28, show times at 8, 9 and 10:30 p.m. $15-$20 thebob.com, (616) 356-2000


cials on Comedy Central. I won Last Comic Standing. I was in a sit- com for two seasons with Rodney Carrington called ‘Rodney.’ I was in a movie, Harold and Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay. I was in all these things, but the one thing I still get recognized for is the


Hemi commercials,” Reep said. Unlike JJ “DY-NO-MITE” Walker of “Goodtimes” fame,


the 39-year-old Hickory, N.C. native embraces his character role. “The fact that someone recognizes me for something that


I’ve done, I don’t look at that as a negative at all,” he said. “I can’t tell people not to talk about the commercials, or that I’m tired of talking about the commercials because that’s part of my past. I was just happy I did a Dodge commercial and not a hemorrhoid commercial.” Coming from a small


industrial town, Reep’s ex- posure to stand-up comedy was limited. Reep credits his father, whom he de- scribed as “the class clown in his day,” for giving him an early knack for making people laugh. “Growing up in a small


“I was just happy I did a Dodge commercial and not a hemorrhoid


THEGILMORECOLLECTION.COM JON REEP


January 26 - 28 42 | REVUEWM.COM | JANUARY 2012


town, you don’t think that stand-up comedy is a real job,” he said. “It wasn’t a realistic thing for me. It was just something where people would say to me, ‘Hey, you should be a comedian,’ and I was just like, ‘Yeah, whatever.’” His first experience with stand-up comedy came at a club in


commercial.” —Jon Reep


Raleigh, N.C. during his time at North Carolina State University. His open-mic sets – which are centered around his country upbringing – became popular, but he still didn’t see the gigs amounting to anything.


“I was sort of doing it as a single man just trying to get the


attention of the ladies,” he said. “I just wanted to be funny for like five to 10 to 15 minutes, and then move on.” But people liked his sets, so he started booking shows around the


country. More than 10 years later, Reep is still getting laughs with stories of his dad and Hickory, N.C. “If you go see Lynyrd Skynyrd and they don’t play “Free Bird,” people are gonna get pissed off,” he said. “I gotta do the greatest hits.” n


SCHEDULE | DINING |SIGHT SOUNDS | SCENE S


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64