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Viewpoint


Is Mood Lighting Coming of Age?


Peter Le Manquais, Technical Director at WILA, discusses how bringing the rhythm of natural light into the interior lit environment is being explored through ‘dynamic lighting’.


intensities, mimicking cool morning light or the warmness of the midday sun. It is possible for these ‘dynamic lights’ to be linked into a fully programmed light control solution to automatically replicate natural light levels at certain points in the day. WILA has recently introduced a hybrid mix of T5 fluorescents and blue LEDs that run off of one piece of control gear to give a “blue boost” to the lit environment at specific times of the day. As people are the most expensive


A look out of any window on a winter’s afternoon will remind us of the power of light – or the lack of it! Wellbeing and energy levels are directly linked to natural light levels and, as such, designers continually explore the boundaries of ‘natural’ light within the workplace to influence mood and subsequently, productivity.


Scientific findings show that light controls the metabolic processes that affect the health and the mental state of a person. In the workplace, the right light can increase a person’s concentration. In an attempt to obtain this ‘right light’, dynamic lighting solutions have been developed that blend warm and cool light sources in an attempt to replicate the rhythms of daylight. This dynamic light is achieved by altering the mix of light output of two different lamps. In the case of WILA’s Dynamic Light Wellness (DLW) range of luminaires, the lamps used are a mixture of cool (up to 17000K) and warm (3000K) T5 fluorescent tubes. This mix of light sources allows the user to alter light levels from a warm white to a cool white, enabling a variety of light


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resource in an organisation, companies look to lighting designers to influence productivity through ‘mood creation’. In a recent city office installation, a major part of the design brief was to maximise natural light to promote employee productivity. However, there is still debate as to the impact dynamic lighting has on overall productivity. One manufacturer claims that increasing light levels from 300 lux to 2000 lux improves productivity by 8%, increases tasks performance by 16% and reduces rejects by 29%. It also makes a positive contribution to safety, reducing accident rates by 52%. Another installation at a UK call centre asked for feedback from its employees, who say that they have a better memory, improved concentration, feel more alert and think that their productivity has improved.


Although there is still a need for more comprehensive scientific study into the impact of dynamic lighting, the subjective research results highlight that this is a subject that is worth pursuing further.


Contact:


WILA T: 01235 773500 www.wila.com


www.a1lightingmagazine.com


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