This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Airport Lighting


Lighten Up


Steve Thomas-Emberson walks us through the difficulties designers face whilst putting together lighting solutions in the airport environment.


The lighting of an airport - let alone a passenger terminal - is a very complex business; it differs greatly from ordinary retail facilities such as Supermarkets, which are in most cases formulaic in size and particularly in height. High street shops are once again quite similar in space orientation. In an airport if there is too much light then there is a risk of “light pollution” together with the breaking of a multitude of environmental regulations. Conversely, not enough and Health and


Safety issues come into play. Unlike the High Street, airports are a 24/7 operation, too. Airports do not earn all their revenue from aircraft, they earn the money from the commercial offer that hopefully passengers will partake in, and this is where “lighting” plays such an important part. Thankfully, the days have long since gone where the airport operator would instruct an electrician where to install lights based on his opinion. Today we have lighting designers who carry out cost evaluations,


maintenance programmes and such before even a single light is installed. So, what is light? In today’s airport it can be solar powered, low voltage combined with a plethora of luminaries, and of course the best light of all - natural. All this has to be measured, installed and managed in an efficient manner. Management systems have to be able to cope automatically with not only falling or raising natural light levels but also heat. Here the light management system will be working with the airports own venting or air conditioning systems. It is no wonder there are specialists! One of the most critical points for the installation of a lighting system is for it to be considered at the beginning of any new build or airport re-construction. It has to be part of the architecture, and therefore part of the master plan, as Mary Rushton-Beales, Managing Director of Lighting Design House articulates; “We have been very lucky in our airport lighting work around the world; architects such as The Design Solution call us in when they receive the design brief for the airports commercial requirements and master-planning. They will know what they have to create to attract passengers to


22 www.a1lightingmagazine.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84