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DEAREDITOR Dear Editor,


Thank you for publishing my letter relating to triple glazing which has generated some interesting responses. Other publications avoid the topic, I believe, to please those large companies that have already gone down the triple glazing route.


The letter from Elaine Hager which you published last month is enlightening but I feel is a little biased.


I accept that triple glazing has its uses but not in its entirety. We have been using ‘English’ hinges, or so we believed, for most of our 40 years in the industry. But we were shocked to discover by chance that they were actually manufactured in China as are door locks and mechanisms. It is much cheaper for English suppliers to source from China.


My main concern with triple glazing is the additional weight. What about the rollers on patio doors? Will the additional weight cause wear and tearing into the track? What about hinges on French doors?


We pride ourselves on the quality of the door hinges we use but we do occasionally have to readjust double glazed doors because of the weight and there has to be a limit. What about large Tilt & Turn windows.


I am horrified with the thought that should Tilt & Turn hinges fail the consequences of such weight falling on a child would be catastrophic.


I appreciate that triple glazing in most casement windows might be a good option (allowing for installers Health & Safety issues with large panes) but patio doors and French doors generally have a larger glass area and I cannot see triple glazing being the best option for them.


Regards Marilyn Jones


CONTACT PAT TODAY!


Write to: CLEARVIEW – DEAR EDITOR, FAO: Patricia Gwynnette, Office F1-F3, Holme Suite, Oaks Business Park, Oaks Lane, Barnsley S71 1HT


Email: pat@clearview-uk.com or patricia.gwynnette@virgin.net


Dear Editor, NEWS...


WE ALL NEED SOME GOOD


With all the gloom and doom and worry about these days, at least Clearview can always be relied upon to supply some good, positive news about the industry and about the people in it as well as industry and product information.


For a start, there is a lot of good being done for charities, and although there are those who take the cynical view that it is all about publicity, I don’t agree. There are some genuinely good people in this industry who will go the extra mile to help others. And don’t do it just to get their face in the press. They don’t have to do it, but they do anyway and it makes a big difference.


I really liked the story in the last issue about how West Yorkshire Windows, Custom Glass and the Conservatory Outlet between them helped that 91


Dear Editor,


I don’t know about other people, but I am amazed at how much time is being spent on ‘Tweeting’ and so on with all these social networking sites. How does anybody get any work done? Or are they doing all this ‘Tweeting’ and joining in forum stuff in their spare time?


You have said in articles in Clearview that it is important for businesses to get using these sites because they can help a lot with marketing, maybe drive up sales, share useful information and so on. But they are very time-consuming – and I can’t help thinking they are a bit risky and addictive - as well.


I don’t want to be a dinosaur stuck in the past, but are we putting too much faith – and too


much precious time and energy - into this sort of thing? Is it really worth it? ‘Reluctant Tweeter’, Blackburn, Lancashire


year old man who’d been subjected to horrendous vandalism in Wakefield. I live not that far away and I am ashamed that such things happen.


It is a pity that at his great age, he couldn’t be rehoused somewhere better to live. But at least his home is much better now. One hopes that the police will be a bit more protective as well, despite their own troubles.


Keep up the good work in 2012 and a Happy New Year to everyone.


Julie Fieldsend, Leeds, West Yorkshire


Editor reply:


Thank you, Julie. We agree that people in this industry do a great job raising money for charities and getting involved in community projects all over the country.


96 « Clearview North « January 2012 « www.clearview-uk.com


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